ARCHIVED - National Capital Commission 2008-2009

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2008-2009 Report Card
National Capital Commission

Official Languages Program Management (15%)

Rating

The National Capital Commission (NCC) does not have an action plan for implementing Parts IV, V and VI of the Official Languages Act. Instead, it uses several documents and practices to implement the Act. The NCC should develop a formal official languages action plan, which would bring together in one document the objectives, measures and relevant timelines required.

The NCC’s Human Resources Management Integrated Framework counts official languages among the fundamental values of the organization, and serves as its accountability framework. The NCC’s administrative policies and procedures regarding official languages also describe the roles and responsibilities of various positions within the institution.

Annual planning of its human resources management activities is set out in an annual memorandum of understanding approved by the Chief Executive Officer. The memorandum includes performance indicators, objectives, timelines and statements of results for all aspects of human resources management, including official languages.

Executive performance agreements include official language objectives. Every year, the plans, balance sheet and annual status reports are submitted to the Human Resources Champion and the Chief Executive Officer for approval.

The recruitment of bilingual employees is standard practice.

The NCC has developed a 2006–2009 action plan for the implementation of section 41 of the Act, which also provides for the development of official language minority communities (OLMCs) and the promotion of linguistic duality in strategic planning. A review of the plan began in 2008–2009 to ensure it is consistent with proposed new performance indicators, and a new plan for 2009–2012 is being developed.

Each year, the NCC submits a status report to Canadian Heritage on its achievements in relation to its 2006–2009 action plan on the implementation of section 41 for the development of OLMCs and the promotion of linguistic duality.

In the NCC’s 2007–2008 report card, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages found no shortcomings to be corrected.

The NCC cooperates fully and actively in handling complaints received by the Office of the Commissioner.

B

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (30%)

According to observations of service in person made by the Office of the Commissioner between June and December 2008, an active visual offer was present in 100% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 50% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 100% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner between June and December 2008, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 100% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 100% of cases.

According to observations of service by e-mail made by the Office of the Commissioner between September and December 2008, the availability of service is comparable for both linguistic groups 88.9% of the time, and benefits Anglophones 11.1% of the time. With regard to the average response times, they are comparable for both linguistic groups.

A

Language of Work  Part V of the Official Languages Act (25%)

The survey conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of the Office of the Commissioner showed that, overall, 82.4% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region (NCR) "strongly agreed" or "mostly agreed" with the language of work regime.

For Francophone respondents, the satisfaction rate by question is presented below.

Survey Questions

Anglophone Respondents

Francophone Respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

N/A

81%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

74%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

91%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

N/A

81%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

 

N/A

85%

B

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians  Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

Overall, the workforce is 59% Francophone.

All employees are located in the NCR.



(Source: NCC database on first official language, February 16, 2009

B

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality  Part VII of the Official Languages Act (20%)

The official languages champion ensures that strategic planning as well as program and policy development take into account the development of OLMCs and the promotion of linguistic duality. More specifically, the NCC takes into account these obligations when it develops its five-year marketing, communications and external relations plan.

However, the NCC has not yet formally reviewed its programs and policies to identify those that could have an impact on the development of OLMCs and the promotion of linguistic duality. Nevertheless, feedback from clients and visitors is analyzed as part of its annual review of activity programming. This analysis enables organizers to take into account the needs expressed by members of OLMCs across Canada.

Members of OLMCs were invited to join a working committee to help identify goals for the 2009–2012 action plan on section 41 of the Act.

When the official languages champion sent the 2007–2008 status report to all provincial OLMC associations, she asked them to submit suggestions for partnership activities of mutual interest.

The Vice-President, Capital Experience, Communications and Marketing keeps OLMC media up to date on projects and events in the NCR to showcase artists from these communities, and thus support and assist in their development while at the same time promoting linguistic duality in Canada. Consequently, this exercise gives the communities a chance to become acquainted with NCC resource people.

The NCC participates in the symposiums and conferences of OLMC arts and culture networks to recruit new talent. It has also established a standing list of organizations that can be consulted, including OLMC artistic associations, business groups and regional representatives.

The NCC organizes and coordinates major events, such as the Canada Day celebrations, Winterlude and the Sound and Light Show on Parliament Hill, and ensures that they include Anglophone artists from Quebec and Francophone artists from outside Quebec, thereby helping Canadians appreciate their country’s linguistic duality.

In addition, the NCC participates in the Business Assistance Program, coordinated by the Regroupement des gens d’affaires de la Capitale nationale along with the City of Ottawa, Public Works and Government Services Canada and Canadian Heritage. The purpose is to provide support for businesses that wish to improve customer services in English and French.

The NCC continues to work in partnership with Canadian Heritage to promote linguistic duality in the NCR. It plans to increase the number of initiatives it has with the Department.

In the past year, the NCC organized several special activities to commemorate the 400th anniversary of Québec City. These initiatives included 400 seconds of fireworks near the Ottawa River on December 31, 2007, at midnight, and Winterlude 2008 celebrations under the theme "400 Winters of Québec." From January to December 2008, "A Glimpse of Québec," a multimedia exhibit of artifacts, photos and historical maps of Québec City, was presented at the Capital Infocentre across from Parliament Hill in Ottawa, and all summer Confederation Boulevard in Ottawa was decorated for the 400th anniversary.

For Winterlude 2009, the NCC included a linguistic duality component with Acadian programming to mark the 225th anniversary of the province of New Brunswick. The Lieutenant-Governor of New Brunswick, the Honourable Herménégilde Chiasson, and the Premier of New Brunswick, the Honourable Shawn Graham, both attended the festival as special guests, and a public reading, in both official languages, of selected texts by His Honour Herménégilde Chiasson, was performed in partnership with the National Arts Centre.  In addition, the French radio station from New Brunswick BO-FM was invited to attend the festivities however was unable to visit the National Capital Region. 

A

Overall Rating

B