ARCHIVED - Canadian Tourism Commission 2006-2007

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Performance Report 2006-2007
Canadian Tourism Commission

Factors and Criteria

Summary of Substantiating Data

Rating

Management (15%)

a) An accountability framework, an action plan and accountability mechanisms are in place (5%)

The Canadian Tourism Commission (CTC) has developed an accountability framework that describes the official languages (OL) roles and responsibilities for all players (Board of Directors, Management Committee, executive directors, employees, OL Champion, OL Co-Champion and Coordinator, Coordinator for Part  VII, and Official Languages Committee). Coordinating the work of all the stakeholders falls under the mandate of the Official Languages Committee, which integrates all appropriate activities. The Management Committee approved the accountability framework in December 2006.

The Commission has an action plan, which sets out the objectives, expected outcomes, planned activities, performance indicators as well as some timelines. It is divided into five sections: Program Management, and Parts IV, V, VI and VII. The Management Committee approved the Action Plan component dealing with Part VII in June 2006 and the other components in December 2006.

In order to measure if objectives of the Action Plan are achieved, the CTC uses the performance appraisals of executive directors, vice-presidents, and the Champion and Co-Champion because they include OL objectives.

A

b) Visibility of official languages in the organization (5%)

The CTC's Strategic Plan takes OL into account in the section on Communications and Public Relations. This unit is responsible for ensuring that the CTC carries out its activities and delivers its programs in compliance with the Official Languages Act (the Act) and its related policies and regulation. The Commission's Corporate Plan emphasizes that Canada's multicultural traditions are an asset upon which the Commission must capitalize, and sets out OL guidelines. The Annual Report does not refer to OL.

The CTC does not have an internal audit unit.

The Senior Vice-President and Corporate Secretary is the OL Champion. She attends Board of Directors and Management Committee meetings. Official languages are discussed by the Management Committee, as required. For example, the new OL policy was presented and discussed at the Management Committee in September 2006.

The Co-Champion is responsible for implementing Parts IV, V, VI and VII. The Champion and Co-Champion coordinate their work through OL Committee meetings, which the Executive Director, Legal Services, of the CTC also attends.

B

c) Complaints (5%)

The OL Co-Champion handles complaints along with the concerned managers, who contact the investigators from the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages (OCOL) directly. The Co-Champion prepares recommendations, which are submitted to the Management Committee, and responds to complaints on behalf of the President. He receives copies of all documents regarding OL complaints. The Champion informs the Management Committee of any complaints received.

This year, in connection with a complaint dealing with a position's language requirements, the Executive Director, Human Resources, worked closely with the OCOL investigator to determine the corrective measures to be implemented; these were then shared with OCOL, the OL Committee, the Management Committee and the employees concerned by the corrective measures.

Following complaints, a particular problem on compliance with the Act was noted and is described at the end of the section on service to the public.

B

Sub-total:

B

Service to the Public - Part IV (25%)

a) Bilingual services advertised to the public and sufficient bilingual staff (3%)

Points of service are advertised in Burolis and will soon be advertised in the blue pages of telephone directories.

A total of 85% of employees in bilingual positions serving the public meet the language requirements for their position. (Source: CTC Official Languages Database, November 2006)

C

b) Observations on active offer and service delivery (15%)

According to observations of in-person service made by OCOL between mid-June and mid-July 2006, an active visual offer was present in 100% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 50% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was adequate in 100% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by OCOL between mid-June and mid-July 2006, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 100% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was adequate in 100% of cases.

B

c) Service agreements delivered by third parties or in partnership provide for the delivery of bilingual services (2%)

The CTC's main clientele is composed of businesses and other players in the tourism industry; the CTC does not deal directly with clients (potential travelers). Partnership agreements do not include a clause requiring services to be delivered in both OL. However, with the assistance of its legal services, the CTC is developing a language clause to be incorporated into all partnership agreements shortly.

The CTC does include a language clause in its advertising contracts.  This encourages its partners to utilize the minority language community print media. The CTC also ensures that communications and services delivered by third parties on its behalf at its offices across Canada are of equal quality in both OL. In many cases, the CTC directly supervises translation to ensure compliance with its standards.

D

d) Policy on service to the public and bilingual services quality monitoring (5%)

The CTC now has an OL policy, which deals with Parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Act. It was approved by the Management Committee in September 2006. The section on Part IV informs managers and employees of their obligations regarding services provided in person and on the telephone, voicemail messages, e-mails, publications, presentations and Web sites.

Employees who are required to serve the public will be informed on how to deliver services in both official languages during an OL workshop scheduled for February 2007. The OL Policy is posted on the CTC's intranet site so that employees can familiarize themselves with their obligations. The Commission also plans to include the Policy in the orientation kit distributed to new employees. The new OL Action Plan was presented to employees. The CTC is also considering holding “lunch and learn” sessions to remind employees of their obligations under Part IV.

There are no formal mechanisms in place to monitor the quality of service to the public. However, since all head office employees work in the same office, it is easy to check whether service is provided in both OL. As a result, management conducts spot checks of the quality of services provided by employees to the public. At the end of 2007, the CTC will launch a “mystery client” program to verify the availability and quality of the services provided to the public in the official language of the linguistic minority.

The Commission also uses the OL performance appraisals of key stakeholders to verify that the organization is complying with the obligations under the Act. The OL database also serves as an audit tool since it contains information on employees who serve the public.

C

Specific Problem

Further to an investigation, OCOL noted a specific problem regarding the lack of use of the minority press for advertising campaigns, which the CTC either conducted, or in which it participated. Media ad space buys focus on national and provincial daily newspapers.

 

Sub-total:

C

Language of Work - Part V (25%)

a) Language of work policy and adequate bilingual supervision (12.5%)

In 2005, the CTC's head office was moved from Ottawa to Vancouver. In light of the language of work application principle established by the Treasury Board, temporary measures were put in place to ensure that the nine Francophone employees from the Ottawa office, who followed the CTC to Vancouver, continue to benefit from the status quo in terms of choice of language of work.

The OL Policy includes a section on Part V that specifies rights and obligations related to supervision, central and personal services, work instruments, language training, computer systems, language of meetings, filing of grievances and internal communications.

Presentations given to CTC employees are always available in both OL, as are the intranet site and work tools. Documents posted in conference rooms are provided in both OL. Orientation sessions for new employees include a component on language of work. The offices of bilingual employees are identified by OL pictograms and a language training plan is in place for employees. Translation and revision services are offered to employees as support measures.

75% of supervisors who must supervise employees who have retained their right to work in the language of their choice in both OL are able to do so. (Source: CTC Official Languages Database, November 2006)

B

b) Use of each official language in the workplace (12.5%)

No formal reminders are sent to the four managers regarding their obligations in terms of language of work. However, the OL Co-Champion reminds managers of their language of work obligations and answers any questions related to OL at working group meetings.

The CTC has not sent any reminders to the nine employees informing them of their right to use their official language of choice. The CTC says that such reminders are unnecessary since the nine Francophone employees who transferred from Ottawa are well aware of their right to work in their language of choice.

Only one of these nine employees is a member of the Management Committee. Management Committee meetings are conducted mainly in English, although presentations are sometimes given in French. Board of Directors meetings are held mainly in English, but simultaneous interpretation is always available.

The CTC had been conducting an annual survey of its employees. As a result of the move and the loss of a large number of employees, this survey was not completed last year. It will be conducted once again next year, and a question will be added to check whether the nine employees with language of work rights are able to exercise these rights and work in their language of choice.

The Commission also uses the OL performance appraisals of key stakeholders to verify that it is complying with the obligations under the Act. The OL database also serves as an audit tool since it contains information on employees' first official language and on employees who are required to be bilingual for language of work purposes.

Given the small number of employees who have language of work rights, the results of the language of work survey administered by Statistics Canada are not available.

D

Sub-total:

C

Equitable Participation - Part VI (10%)

a) Percentage of Francophone participation throughout Canada (5%)

Overall, the workforce is 26.3% Francophone. (Source: OLIS II, March 2006)

A

b) Percentage of Anglophone participation in Quebec (5%)

All personnel is located in British Columbia and in the National Capital Region (NCR).

N/A

Sub-total:

A

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality - Part VII (25%)

a) Strategic planning and the development of policies and programs take into account the development of official language minority communities (12.5%)

The Three-Year Results-Based Action Plan (2006-2009) for the Implementation of Section 41 of the Act serves as an ongoing mechanism to ensure that CTC's strategic planning, and policy and program development take into account the obligation to foster the development of official language minority communities (OLMCs). The OL Committee serves a similar purpose. In addition, the OL Champion, who is a member of the OL Committee, reviews all issues brought to the Board of Directors.

On December 5, 2005, the OL Champion gave a presentation to the Management Committee on the amendments to Part VII of the Act. In the spring of 2006, the Champion also presented the Action Plan for the Implementation of Part VII to the Management Committee for approval. This presentation helped to raise awareness among Management Committee members in regard to the amendments to the Act. The provisions of section 41 of the Act are standing items on the agenda of Management Committee meetings.

The OL Co-Champion and the OL Committee are responsible for the implementation of Part VII (OLMC development).

The OL Co-Champion liaises with OLMCs. He meets with OLMCs of each province one at a time. To date, he has met with OLMCs in Quebec, British Columbia, Saskatchewan and the Yukon. The Co-Champion receives requests from OLMCs and organizes meetings with the CTC's available personnel. For example, the CTC met with agencies to discuss a number of marketing issues. These include the Société de développement économique de la Colombie-Britannique regarding OLMC access to opportunities arising out of the 2010 Olympic Games, the Vancouver branch office of the Government of Quebec regarding roles and responsibilities in terms of funding for OLMC programs, and the Economic Development Council for Manitoba Bilingual Communities regarding its promotional campaign, “C'est si bon. Ensemble - Together”.

Issues of Bulletin 41-42 are distributed to CTC employees. Although awareness has not been promoted among employees to date, starting in January 2007, the CTC plans to give regular bilingual presentations to all personnel, add information to employee orientation kits and provide orientation sessions to new employees, in order to ensure that all employees are aware of OLMC needs.

The CTC has not begun reviewing its policies and programs to determine those with an impact on OLMCs.

The CTC has taken several positive measures to promote the development of OLMCs, including, among others, the Canada Program, which encourages Canadians to explore Canada. Quebec clients, considered to be the largest OLMC target market in the country, are encouraged to explore other provinces by car. The CTC has also created a database with an updated list of OLMC contacts to distribute a wide range of communication products (e.g. Tourism Magazine, Tourism Daily, Tourism Online, CTC Annual Report, CTC press releases and CTC event notices). On February 3, 2006, the Canadian tourism industry, including OLMCs, held an online meeting to hear a presentation on why less Americans travel to Canada for pleasure. The on-line presentation was simultaneously translated into French, and later, other tourism representatives were able to access an audio broadcast on the Web in both OL.

Sixty-one OLMCs were invited and 52 OLMC Francophone tourism representatives participated in the CTC's annual tour of 7 Canadian cities (Yellowknife, Montreal, Toronto, Halifax, Vancouver, Saskatoon and Calgary) to learn about CTC's marketing programs. These meetings helped OLMCs share their needs with the CTC. The tour ended on November 10, 2006.

The information collected during the tour was forwarded to the Co-Champion and Coordinator for Part VII, who distributed this information to CTC's OL Committee.

The results of these consultations are used to develop marketing plans geared to foreign clients. The results also helped develop an action plan to give OLMCs access to the opportunities arising out of the Olympic Games, so that they can benefit from any tourism    spin-offs. To that end, the CTC intends to continue the dialogue with OLMCs and will use their participation to create an inventory of tourism products.

The Action Plan for the Implementation of Section 41 was revised to take the amendments into account and to include positive measures to foster the regional development of OLMCs. After management approved the Plan, it was sent to OLMCs for feedback. The Action Plan was developed based on the evaluation framework proposed by Canadian Heritage and includes performance indicators. Each year, the CTC submits a status report to Canadian Heritage. Finally, results are evaluated based on the performance objectives set out in the OL Champion and Co-Champion performance appraisals.

B

b) Strategic planning and the development of policies and programs take into account the promotion of linguistic duality (12.5%)

The Three-Year Results-Based Action Plan (2006-2009) for the Implementation of Section 41 of the Act serves as an on-going mechanism to ensure that CTC's strategic planning, and policy and program development take into account the obligation to promote the equality of status and use of English and French. The OL Committee serves a similar purpose. In addition, the OL Champion, who is a member of the OL Committee, reviews all issues brought to the Board of Directors.

On December 5, 2005, the OL Champion gave a presentation to the Management Committee on the amendments to Part VII of the Act. In the spring of 2006, the Champion also presented the Action Plan for the Implementation of Part VII to the Management Committee for approval. This presentation helped to raise awareness among Management Committee members in regard to the amendments to the Act. The provisions of section 41 of the Act are standing items on the Management Committee's agenda.

The OL Co-Champion and the OL Committee are responsible for the implementation of Part VII (promotion and use of English and French).

The Co-Champion liaises with appropriate associations. For example, in partnership with associations such as theCorridor touristique francophone de l'Ouest and the Association canadienne-française de l'Alberta, the CTC invited Francophone reporters to visit more than 16 OLMCs in Western Canada to improve their understanding of linguistic duality.

Awareness of the issues is promoted among CTC personnel, who play a role in promoting linguistic duality, through meetings with the OL Champion and Co-Champion, the Action Plan for the Implementation of Section 41 and the OL Policy.

Marketing plans to attract foreign clients have been reviewed. Linguistic duality is used as an asset to attract foreign tourists to Canada. The CTC consulted with Canadian Heritage and OLMCs during its annual tour to create a brand image, which reflects Canada's linguistic duality.

The CTC has taken several positive measures to promote the equality of status and use of English and French, both internally and in Canadian society. The CTC promotes cultural events sponsored by OLMCs (films, Festival du bois) on its intranet site under the heading “Joie de vivre, ça se passe en français”, to encourage its employees to participate in these events. The CTC uses linguistic duality as an asset to sell the country abroad. The new bilingual logo promotes the image of a bilingual Canada. The CTC's new brand is posted on its Web sites since January 2007. The magazine Tourism Online is available in a bilingual format and contains the CTC logo. The Commission's annual reports are shared with the industry in both OL. Since Web sites are the top advertising methods, they are always accessible in both OL.

The Action Plan for the Implementation of Section 41 was revised to take the amendments into account and to include positive measures to promote linguistic duality. After the Management Committee approved the Plan, it was sent to the appropriate associations for feedback. The Action Plan was developed based on the evaluation framework proposed by Canadian Heritage and includes performance indicators. Each year, the CTC submits a status report to Canadian Heritage. Finally, results are evaluated based on the performance objectives set out in the OL Champion and Co-Champion performance appraisals.

B

Sub-total:

B

OVERALL RATING

 

C