ARCHIVED - Canada Economic Development for the Regions of Quebec 2006-2007

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Performance Report 2006-2007
Canada Economic Development for the Regions of Quebec

Factors and Criteria

Summary of Substantiating Data

Rating

Management (15%)

a) An accountability framework, an action plan and accountability mechanisms are in place (5%)

The Economic Development Agency of Canada for the Regions of Quebec has an accountability framework for the Official Languages Act (the Act) and a policy on institutional bilingualism. These documents describe all of the official languages (OL) roles and responsibilities for all levels of the Agency, as well as coordination mechanisms and how responsible individuals are held accountable. The Accountability Framework specifies how obligations under Parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Act are to be fulfilled.

The Action Plan, which has been approved by senior management, outlines the objectives to be achieved, planned activities, and timeframes. The achievement of the Action Plan's objectives is assessed in the OL Annual Review (targeted review) submitted to the Public Service Human Resources Management Agency of Canada (PSHRMAC) and signed by the President. The latter forwarded her strategic objectives to the Agency's senior executives. Priorities, expectations and desired results, which include OL, are set out in a performance agreement between the President and senior executives. The Internal OL Committee made up of directors coordinates and monitors the application of the OL program within the Agency.

A

b) Visibility of official languages in the organization (5%)

One of the Internal OL Committee's roles is to ensure that the provisions regarding the OL program are included in the various activities of the Agency's integrated management cycle and that the OLA Lens is applied at various stages of this cycle. The 2006-2007 Report on Plans and Priorities refers to the economic development of official language minority communities (OLMCs) and the audit of the Act's application. The 2005-2006 Performance Report devotes a section to official languages. The Agency's internal audit team integrated the OL component in its annual planning for 2006-2007. This audit will specifically target the Community Futures Program. An assessment of the results of the Interdepartmental Partnership with the Official Language Communities (IPOLC) is currently under way.

The Corporate Management Committee discusses OL issues and approved the new OL Accountability Framework in February 2006. The OL Champion is a director general and sits on the Management Committee. She meets regularly with the persons responsible for implementing Parts IV, V, VI and VII of the Act, with whom she has an excellent working relationship. For example, the presentations that were part of the fall 2006 regional OL tour were given jointly.

A

c) Complaints (5%)

No complaints were filed against the Agency in 2005-2006 with the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages (OCOL). Administrative guidelines on managing OL complaints are in place. If a complaint is filed, a working group composed of a representative from the affected sector, the Human Resources Division Coordinator and Legal Services is set up to gather and analyze information and to develop a response strategy. OL coordinators, together with Legal Services, must ensure that corrective measures are taken and appropriate controls are implemented in order to prevent recurrences. Senior management is regularly informed of trends and problems that may have an impact on the Agency. The Agency reports on complaints received in its annual review to PSHRMAC.

A

Sub-total:

A

Service to the Public - Part IV (25%)

a) Bilingual services advertised to the public and sufficient bilingual staff (3%)

Designated bilingual offices are identified in Burolis, in the blue pages and on the Agency's Internet site.

A total of 96% of employees in bilingual positions serving the public meet the language requirements of their position. (Source: Position and Classification Information System (PCIS), March 31, 2006)

B

b) Observations on active offer and service delivery (15%)

According to observations of in-person service made by OCOL between mid-June and mid-July 2006, an active visual offer was present in 85% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 0% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was adequate in 92% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by OCOL between mid-June and mid-July 2006, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 80% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was adequate in 100% of cases.

B

c) Service agreements delivered by third parties or in partnership provide for the delivery of bilingual services (2%)

There is an OL clause that specifies the parties' obligations in contribution agreements. Program officers verify that this clause is included and check the content.

Complaints received and information in contribution reports are used to determine whether third parties deliver quality services in both OL. The Agency feels that these measures are sufficient, given the few complaints received.

B

d) Policy on service to the public and bilingual services quality monitoring (5%)

The section dealing with the language of service to the public, which is included in the Institutional Bilingualism Policy, sets out the requirements for the delivery of bilingual services and communications. The policy statement and preamble outline the Agency's commitment to the equality of English and French. Employees are kept up to date via the intranet site, internal communications, the G@zette, and Kaléidoscope, the employee newspaper. A regional OL tour conducted in the fall of 2006 helped raise employees' awareness and keep them informed.

The Agency conducts an annual survey and produces a report on the accessibility and quality of services offered in English to the Anglophone community. It also conducted an audit in February and March 2006 to respond to the recommendations of the Commissioner of Official Languages. The purpose of the audit was to determine if community futures development corporations (CFDCs) and business development centres (BDCs) were providing adequate services in both official languages. The report, completed by Consulting and Audit Canada, will be posted on the Agency's website in 2006-2007. The Annual Review to PSHRMAC is another control mechanism.

B

Sub-total:

B

Language of Work - Part V (25%)

a) Language of work policy and adequate bilingual supervision (12.5%)

The Institutional Bilingualism Policy includes a section on language of work, which sets out the obligations and rights relating to supervision, central and personal services, professional training and development, work instruments and computer systems, language of meetings and internal communications.

Employees are encouraged to discuss their language training or learning retention requirements with their manager and to record them in their learning plan. In addition to language training, the Agency offers language skills development sessions to help employees retain or develop their language proficiency. The Agency also ensures that the computer systems it acquires or produces complies with the requirements under the Act. A computerized learning management system has been implemented.

As of March 31, 2006, the Position and Classification Information System (PCIS) indicated that 100% of senior management and 95% of supervisors who must communicate with their staff in both languages in bilingual regions are bilingual.

B

b) Use of each official language in the workplace (12.5%)

Presentations given during the regional OL tour in the fall of 2006 reminded employees of their rights and managers of their obligations with respect to language of work. A presentation was given to the internal OL committee about language of work obligations.

A pamphlet entitled English and French in the Workplace is distributed to new employees as part of the Agency's integration strategy. Participants are reminded at the beginning of each meeting of their right to use the official language of their choice. Management committee meetings are held in both official languages, depending on the topics of discussion.

The Agency uses complaints received and the results of the Public Service Employee Survey to monitor the application of the language of work policy.

The Public Service Employee Survey showed that overall, 97% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region (NCR) "strongly agreed" or "mostly agreed" with the language of work regime. Due to the small number of Anglophone respondents in the bilingual regions of Québec, OCOL was not in a position to use the results of the 2005 Survey.

B

Sub-total:

B

Equitable Participation  - Part VI (10%)

a) Percentage of Francophone participation throughout Canada (5%)

Overall, the workforce is 98% Francophone. (Source: PCIS, March 31, 2006). All of the Agency's offices are located in Quebec, however the Gatineau office is located in the NCR.

B

b) Percentage of Anglophone participation in Quebec (5%)

In Quebec, the workforce is 1.8% Anglophone. (Source: PCIS, March 31, 2006)

E

Sub-total:

C

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality - Part  VII (25%)

a) Strategic planning and the development of policies and programs take into account the development of official language minority communities (12.5%)

The Agency has produced an action plan for the implementation of section 41 of the Act and produces an annual status report. The objectives of section 41 have been included in departmental planning and reporting documents. The Accountability Framework specifies that one of the responsibilities of the Policy and Planning Branch is to implement the OLA Lens, specifically, to determine at the onset, as part of its strategic planning, and strategy and policy development, whether there will be an impact on the vitality of OLMCs, and if required, to specify the required action and expected results. In addition, one of the roles of the Internal OL Committee is to ensure that the provisions on the OL Program are included in the various activities of the Agency's integrated management cycle, and that the OLA Lens is considered at various stages of this cycle.

Further to the amendments to the Act, the new obligations to take positive measures to enhance the vitality and support the development of Anglophone and Francophone minorities in Canada were presented by the Champion at a Management Committee meeting; discussions followed. OL training was also provided for the Internal OL Committee in March 2006.

In addition to a national coordinator, the Agency has a team of coordinators in various business offices that are well known to OLMCs to liaise and share information internally. The National Coordinator occasionally participates in the OL Champions Forum. The fall 2006 regional tour helped increase employees' awareness and provided an opportunity to share information on OL and OLMCs. In addition, the Internal Committee ensures that relevant information is distributed within the branches of the Agency's head office.

Based on its mandate to ensure regional and community development, the Agency feels that its policies and programs help fulfill its commitment to support OLMC development. In cooperation with Legal Services, the Agency has revised its accountability framework and developed tools to train its regional and headquarters staff, and share information. Until the OLA Lens has been fully developed, all new programs or policies must be analyzed based on operational guidelines.

In 2005-2006, the Agency approved 92 new projects for Quebec's English-speaking community, worth a total of $11.5 million. A study of the socio-economic profile of Quebec's English-speaking community is currently under way and will help the Agency better target its programs. The Agency is also working with various federal agencies to expand its offer of services for OLMCs. Agency representatives attend the meetings of national and regional coordinators responsible for section 41, which are organized by Canadian Heritage

The Agency has undertaken many formal and informal consultations and exchanges with Anglophone communities, including meetings organized by the Privy Council Office. The Agency also actively participated in organizing and conducting sectoral consultations with the Anglophone community in cooperation with Industry Canada. On a regular basis, the Agency participates in meetings of the National Committee for Canadian Francophonie Human Resources Development (NCCFHRD), co-chairs the Standing Working Group on Job Creation and Economic Diversification, and is a member of the Executive Committee. The Agency organized a series of meetings with representatives of the Community Table to explore avenues for cooperation.

The Agency has held public consultations with Lower North Shore communities to plan an intervention strategy as part of the Fishing Community Economic Diversification Initiative (FCEDI). Some OLMC proposals were incorporated into the FCEDI. The Agency holds regular discussions with the Community Economic Development and Employability Committees (CEDECs). Advisory committees (development and implementation of the vitality index and the social investment network) involving the Anglophone community were put in place at the request of the Agency, who attended several meetings.

The Agency gives a few ad hoc presentations to the members of the Anglophone community, depending on the work status, progress made under certain pilot projects, and the phases of the OL Action Plan. The Agency distributes the Status Report to the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) and the Community Table, and posts it on the Internet. The Agency provides information for OLMCs to Industry Canada for publication on the Communaction.ca site. The Agency continues to work with Government of Canada partners by participating in various horizontal initiatives, such as Human Resources and Social Development Canada's Official Language Minority Communities Support Fund.

The current Action Plan describes the activities' objectives, the expected results and responsibilities. There are no specific performance indicators. This plan is being revised and will take into consideration the expressed needs of OLMCs.

B

b) Strategic planning and the development of policies and programs take linguistic duality into account (12.5%)

Section 41 objectives have been included in departmental planning and reporting documents. Under the accountability framework, the Policy and Planning Branch is responsible for implementing the OLA Lens, specifically, to determine at the onset, as part of its strategic planning, and strategy and policy development, whether there will be an impact on linguistic duality, and if required, to specify the required action and expected results.

Further to the amendments to the Act, new obligations, including the requirement to foster the full recognition and use of English and French in Canadian society, were presented by the Champion at a Management Committee meeting. OL training was also provided to the Internal Committee in March 2006.

In addition to a national coordinator, the Agency has a team of coordinators in various business offices to provide regional liaison and share information internally. Promoting linguistic duality among staff was included as part of the presentation given during the fall 2006 regional tour. In addition, the Internal Committee ensures that information is distributed within the branches of the Agency's head office.

Based on its mandate to ensure regional and community development, the Agency feels that its policies and programs help fulfill its commitment to support OLMC development. In cooperation with Legal Services, the Agency has revised its accountability framework and developed tools to train its regional and headquarters staff, and to share information. Until the OLA Lens has been fully developed, all new programs and policies must be analyzed based on operational guidelines.

A translation budget has been allotted to partner agencies under the contractual agreement between the Agency and community futures development corporations (CFDCs), and business development centres that serve an Anglophone clientele (CEDECs). The Agency has included a clause on OL-related requirements in the contract of the National Optics Institute, a world-class centre of excellence in applied optics and photonics, which provides Canadian industry with technical assistance needed for growth and supports research and development.

The Agency helped 24 young Anglophones complete internships in the knowledge economy sector in Quebec. In addition, the 2006 edition of the Anglophone Camp JE allowed 39 youths to participate in a week-long introduction to entrepreneurship. A committee of Anglophone and Francophone representatives from Lower North Shore towns has been struck to ensure an entrepreneurship approach to regional social development.

The Agency participates in the meetings of national and regional coordinators responsible for section 41, organized by Canadian Heritage. The Agency distributes the Status Report to the Quebec Community Groups Network (QCGN) and the Community Table, and posts it on the Internet. It also provides information for OLMCs to Industry Canada for posting on the Communaction.ca site. The Agency continues to work with Government of Canada partners by participating in various horizontal initiatives, such as the Government's Action Plan for Official Languages.

Although activities and projects have been undertaken to promote linguistic duality, the current Action Plan does not set out any specific promotion measures. However, it is being revised to ensure that it complies with amendments to the Act and that it will take into account the promotion of linguistic duality.

B

Sub-total:

B

OVERALL RATING

B