ARCHIVED - Business Development Bank of Canada 2008-2009

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2008-2009 Report Card
Business Development Bank of Canada

Official Languages Program Management
(15%)

Rating

In December 2008, the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC) developed its first action plan for Parts IV, V and VI of the Official Languages Act. The plan includes a summary of the BDC’s responsibilities for each part of the Act. While the plan offers a variety of actions to meet official languages responsibilities, the BDC should focus on continuing to improve its results for active offer of service and ensuring that bilingual locations have bilingual resources. The BDC’s action plan should also be more precise regarding timelines and objectives, specifically as they relate to bilingual services offered to the public.

The BDC has an action plan to ensure the implementation of Part VII of the Act. This plan includes measures to achieve targeted results for the development of official language minority communities (OLMCs) and promotion of linguistic duality. The BDC has delivered 50% of presentations to BDC leaders regarding official languages responsibilities. The leaders disseminate information to their employees. The BDC has also provided 100% of tip sheets to new employees and leaders about official languages and responsibilities as a Crown corporation.

The BDC produces an annual review of official languages at the end of each fiscal year and submits the report to the Canada Public Service Agency and Canadian Heritage. The BDC also annually completes a report on results and an action plan for section 41, which is submitted to Canadian Heritage.

In June 2008, the BDC received a complaint about service to the public. This has been the only complaint against the institution in the past three years. The BDC acted promptly to correct the situation raised by this complaint.

B

Service to the Public Part IV of the Official Languages Act (30%)

According to observations of service in person made by the Office of the Commissioner between June and December 2008, an active visual offer was present in 88.7% of cases, an active offer by staff was made in 16.9% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 59.3% of cases.

According to observations of service on the telephone made by the Office of the Commissioner between June and December 2008, an active offer by staff or by an automated system was made in 100% of cases, while service in the language of the linguistic minority was available in 91.2% of cases.

According to observations of service by e-mail made by the Office of the Commissioner between September and December 2008, the availability of service offered by the institution is comparable for both linguistic groups 90% of the time, and benefits Francophones 10% of the time. With regard to the average response times, they are comparable for both linguistic groups.

B

Language of Work  Part V of the Official Languages Act (25%)

The survey conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of the Office of the Commissioner showed that, overall, 86.5% of Francophone respondents in the National Capital Region (NCR), New Brunswick and the bilingual regions of Ontario "strongly agreed" or "mostly agreed" with the language of work regime. In Quebec, 93.7% of Anglophone respondents were of the same opinion.

For both categories of respondents, the satisfaction rate by question is presented below.

Survey Questions

Anglophone Respondents

Francophone Respondents

The material and tools provided for my work, including software and other automated tools, are available in the official language of my choice.

99%

94%

When I prepare written materials, including electronic mail, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

91%

83%

When I communicate with my immediate supervisor, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

98%

89%

During meetings in my work unit, I feel free to use the official language of my choice.

91%

71%

The training offered by my work unit is in the official language of my choice.

89%

94%

A

Participation of English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians  Part VI of the Official Languages Act (10%)

Overall, the workforce is 39% Francophone.

In Quebec, excluding the NCR, the workforce is 20.4% Anglophone.

(Source: BDC, February 23, 2009)

A

Development of Official Language Minority Communities and Promotion of Linguistic Duality  Part VII of the Official Languages Act (20%)

The BDC integrates the application of Part VII into its daily operations by promoting Canada’s two official languages through its mandate and organizational priorities. Through business development, membership in associations, partnerships, financial services and consulting groups, the BDC maintains an active presence nationwide in relation to OLMCs. As a commercial lender offering long-term business financing, the BDC serves clients in both official languages. To support the development of OLMCs, the BDC works with the communities through various business development activities, including partnerships with Community Futures Development Corporations and Community Business Development Corporations. A more formal mechanism for taking into account Part VII would allow the BDC to better understand and evaluate its actions dedicated to the development of OLMCs and promotion of linguistic duality.

The BDC uses various mechanisms to consult with OLMCs. The BDC's official languages champion attends an annual meeting of official languages champions. The BDC offices and employees are members of a number of OLMC groups and associations. Local BDC account managers also establish networks of business customers and local organizations (including minority-community business groups) for potential business development.

In the past year, the BDC sponsored the Lauriers de la PME competition organized by the Réseau de développement économique et d’employabilité in the amount of $10,000, and the national symposium of the Canadian Association of Family Enterprise. The BDC also supports the Capitale Nationale business association.

In August 2008, the BDC contributed $2,500 to an activity organized by the Conseil de la Coopération de la Saskatchewan, the camp Jeunes entrepreneurs.

As a member of the Conseil économique du Nouveau-Brunswick (CENB), the BDC participated in and sponsored various business activities organized or supported by the CENB. In October 2008, during Small Business Week, the BDC sponsored the Semaine de la PME in the Acadian Peninsula, and all branch employees were invited to attend.

One of the BDC’s challenges is to introduce more measures promoting linguistic duality. Other measures should flow from a more formal mechanism for taking into account the needs of OLMCs. This would help identify the actions taken by the BDC to support the development of such communities.

B

Overall Rating

B