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SUMMARY

Six commissioners, four decades
English and French in federal institutions
Promoting the learning of the official languages
Support for official language minority communities
The coherence of government actions and the Olympics
Recommendations

FOREWORD BY GRAHAM FRASER

The Quest for Coherence

AWARD OF EXCELLENCE

Promotion of Linguistic Duality

CHAPTER 1: THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE OFFICIAL LANGUAGES ACT

Before the 1969 Official Languages Act:
A country on the verge of crisis
1970–1977 The first commissioner Keith Spicer
Laying the foundations
1977–1984 Commissioner Maxwell Yalden
Constitutional recognition of the equal status of English and French
1984–1991 Commissioner D’Iberville Fortier
A more solid framework
1991–1999 Commissioner Victor Goldbloom
Linguistic duality at the heart of national unity
1999–2006 Commissioner Dyane Adam
A revival founded on communities, duality and diversity
2006 to the present Commissioner Graham Fraser
Linguistic duality, a fundamental part of Canadian identity
Conclusion

CHAPTER 2: VISION, LEADERSHIP AND COMMITMENT: FUNDAMENTALS OF THE FULL IMPLEMENTATION OF THE ACT

1.0 The situation is evolving, but too slowly
2.0 Update on the renewed approach of the Commissioner of Official Languages
3.0 A dynamic vision of linguistic duality
4.0 Communications with the public and delivery of services of equal quality

4.1 Active offer of service
4.2 Availability of services
4.3 Institutional transformation: Will the past predict the future?
4.4 Air Canada’s transformations and the erosion of its employees’ and customers’ rights
4.5 The situation in major airports

5.0 Towards a workplace that respects both official languages

5.1 Progress that is a long time coming
5.2 Linguistic duality: A question of leadership
5.3 Language training: A key to success

6.0 Promotion of English and French and development of official language communities

6.1 Increase promotion of English and French and support the development of official language communities
6.2 Report card results
6.3 Examples of positive measures

6.3.1 Farm Credit Canada
6.3.2 CBC/Radio-Canada
6.3.3 Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
6.3.4 The Prince Edward Island Federal Council

7.0 Governance: Essential to supporting leadership
8.0 Conclusion: We must stay on course for linguistic equality
Recommendations

CHAPTER 3: PROMOTING THE LEARNING OF OUR TWO OFFICIAL LANGUAGES: SEEKING A TRUE LANGUAGE CONTINUUM

1.0 Bilingualism: From the 1960s to the present
2.0 Bilingualism gives an edge
3.0 The vision of bilingualism in Canada
4.0 Obstacles to bilingualism

4.1 Misperceptions limit the demand for second-language school programs
4.2 Too many students lack the opportunity to effectively learn the other official language
4.3 Too few courses are offered to students at the post-secondary level in their second language
4.4 Too few post-secondary institutions actively promote the importance of bilingualism to their students
4.5 There are too few links between students and official language communities
4.6 Students lack language exchange opportunities in Canada
4.7 Too few Canadians have an opportunity to acquire second-language skills outside the school system

5.0 The federal government: An essential player
6.0 Conclusion: Language issues are economic issues
Recommendation

CHAPTER 4: OFFICIAL LANGUAGE MINORITY COMMUNITIES: THRIVING IN THE PUBLIC SPACE, FROM COAST TO COAST TO COAST

1.0 The evolution of official language minority communities since the 1960s

1.1 The evolution of French-speaking communities outside Quebec
1.2 The evolution of English-speaking communities in Quebec

2.0 The new environment of official language communities
3.0 A vision of official language communities focused on their vitality
4.0 The Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008–2013: Acting for the Future and the communities
5.0 Analysis of the situation of the official language communities in six areas of activity

5.1 Education
5.2 Community economic development
5.3 Justice
5.4 Arts and culture
5.5 Health
5.6 Demographic vitality

5.6.1 Immigration in minority Francophone communities
5.6.2 Renewal of English-speaking communities in Quebec

6.0 Conclusion: Need for vigorous action on the part of the federal government
Recommendation

CONCLUSION

Increasing the Visibility of Official Languages

Appendice A: Complaint resolution process

Appendice B: Complaints – Summary analysis and table

Table 1 – Number of admissible complaints in 2008–2009, by province or territory and by category

Appendice C: Report cards for the airports – Methodology and results

Table 2 – Airport observation results 2008–2009

Appendice D: Report cards for 15 “separate employer” federal institutions – Methodology and results

Table 3 – Comparative ratings table
Table 4 – Observation results on service in 2008–2009

Appendice E: Methodology for collecting data on language of work

Table 5 – Degree of satisfaction of Anglophone and Francophone federal employees in minority settings with regard to the use of their language in the workplace
Table 6 – Language of work survey results