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SUMMARY

FOREWORD BY GRAHAM FRASER

CHAPTER I: OFFICIAL LANGUAGES AND LEADERSHIP

PART 1: FINDINGS ON THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE OFFICIAL LANGUAGES ACT

Implementation of parts IV, V and VII

Overview
Communications with and services to the public: Partly cloudy skies
Language of work: A weak link
Advancement of English and French: A bittersweet portrait
A new guide for Part VII
The Commissionerís expectations of federal institutions
Nationwide findings on the implementation of Part VII
Communities and federal institutions: A complex relationship
Promotion of linguistic duality: The poor cousin of Part VII

The ombudsman role: a renewed approach

Background
Two principles for a renewed approach

PART 2: VISION, COMMITMENT AND LEADERSHIP

The Action Plan

First axis: Education
Second axis: Community development
Third axis: The public service
Fourth axis: The language industry
The Official Languages Accountability and Coordination Framework
The Commissionerís other expectations

Horizontal governance and coordination

The current structure of horizontal governance in official languages
Horizontal governance: Principles to keep in mind
Understanding the current coordination of horizontal governance

Public service renewal

Thoughts and perspectives
Recruiting bilingual employees
Linguistic duality: A key component of public service renewal
Possible courses of action

1) Commitment from senior management
2) Training
3) Post-secondary recruitment
4) Language training

CONCLUSION: CHAPTER I

CHAPTER II: OFFICIAL LANGUAGES IN A CHANGING WORLD

PART 1: CHANGES TO THE CANADIAN FEDERATION

Senate reform

Hard lessons from the past: Government transformations

Limiting spending power

PART 2: SHARED CITIZENSHIP, LINGUISTIC DUALITY AND THE EVOLVING REALITY OF CULTURAL DIVERSITY

An historical perspective

Todayís realities

Looking to the future: The full participation of all Canadians in the national dialogue

Immigration and French-speaking communities

Multiple identities and a shared national dialogue in our two official languages

Actions for moving forward

The governmentís role

CONCLUSION: CHAPTER II

CHAPTER III: PROMOTION OF LINGUISTIC DUALITY AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

PART 1: THE PROMOTION OF LINGUISTIC DUALITY

Second-language learning

The continuity of instruction
Demand and access
Human resources
Learning through culture
Program evaluation
Research
English-as-a-second-language instruction in Quebec

Linguistic duality in Canadaís international relations

Study on bilingualism at the 2010 Olympic Games

PART 2: THE DEVELOPMENT OF OFFICIAL LANGUAGE COMMUNITIES

2006 census

The demographic weight of Anglophones and Francophones
The allophone immigrant population
Bilingualism
Official language communities

Post-censal survey of the vitality of official language communities

Overview of the communities

Studies on community vitality: Stakeholders speak up

Study on funding agencies

Study on the arts and culture

CONCLUSION: CHAPTER III

CHAPTER IV: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE OFFICIAL LANGUAGES ACT: STRONGER LEADERSHIP FOR BETTER RESULTS

The major official languages story of 2007–2008

Lessons learned

PART 1: OVERVIEW OF THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE OFFICIAL LANGUAGES ACT

The Commissionerís tools for ensuring compliance

Overall portrait for 2007–2008

Complaints received in 2007–2008
Trends in admissible complaints over the last three years
2007–2008 report cards
Report card methodology and changes made in 2007–2008
Presentation of results
Overall report card results for 2007–2008
Overall report card trends over the last three years
Conclusion: Overview of the implementation of the Act

PART 2: A CLOSER LOOK AT SERVICE TO THE PUBLIC

Admissible complaints related to service to the public in 2007–2008
Report card results for service to the public in 2007–2008
Bilingual capacity

Observations on service to the public
Audits and follow-ups related to service to the public
Audit follow-ups
Proactive or preventive interventions made in 2007–2008 related to service to the public
Court interventions made in 2007–2008 related to service to the public
Examples of leadership in service to the public
Conclusion: Service to the public

PART 3: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE LANGUAGE OF WORK

Admissible complaints related to language of work in 2007–2008
Report card results for language of work in 2007–2008
Bilingual supervision
Language of work survey
Analysis of the survey results
Audits and follow-ups related to language of work
Examples of leadership related to language of work
Conclusion: Language of work

PART 4: A CLOSER LOOK AT THE DEVELOPMENT OF OFFICIAL LANGUAGE MINORITY COMMUNITIES AND THE PROMOTION OF LINGUISTIC DUALITY

Admissible complaints related to the advancement of English and French in 2007–2008
Report card results for the advancement of English and French in 2007–2008

Designated institutions
Non-designated institutions
Audits and follow-ups related to the advancement of English and French
Examples of leadership in the advancement of English and French
Conclusion: Advancement of English and French

CONCLUSION: CHAPTER IV

CONCLUSION



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