2020–21 Departmental Results Report

The original version was signed by:

The Honourable Bill Blair, P.C., C.O.M., M.P.
President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and Minister of Emergency Preparedness

 

Commissioner’s message

Raymond Théberge

I am pleased to report on my office’s activities and results over the past year, which support the major priorities I set out at the start of my mandate: monitoring the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023: Investing in Our Future, making sure that federal institutions meet their official languages obligations, modernizing the Official Languages Act, and fostering a culture of continuous improvement, collaboration and resource optimization within the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

This year, we continued our work to improve our complaint and investigation strategies to address the increased volume of complaints we receive and the systemic issues related to official languages. We also continued to focus on working more collaboratively as an organization, both internally and externally, to prioritize our interventions with federal institutions.

Over the past year, in addition to my annual report to Parliament, my office published three reports: on the impact of emergency situations on official languages, on the language requirements of positions in the federal public service, and on linguistic insecurity in the public service. We also provided tools related to the latter two reports, one to help build a public service workforce capable of providing effective services in both official languages, and one to help create a work environment in the federal public service that is conducive to the use of both English and French.

Although a selected number of federal institutions were specifically chosen to participate in the Official Languages Maturity Model exercise, all federal institutions can access it as an innovative online tool to help them establish the structures and systems they need to better comply with their obligations under the Official Languages Act. Since the launch of the Official Languages Maturity Model in 2019, 14 federal institutions have participated in a formal exercise, during which my staff reviews their self-assessments and provides targeted feedback to help them with their progress.

We have reached the midway point for the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018‍–‍2023: Investing in our Future, and my office has been working closely with federal institutions and a variety of community partners across Canada to monitor the progress on the Action Plan’s expected outcomes. We developed a dashboard to gather information on the implementation of the Action Plan, and we will continue our monitoring over the duration of the plan to guide our interventions and inform our recommendations for the government’s next official languages action plan.

In support of my role to promote English and French in Canada, my office conducted storytelling campaigns on social media that featured second language teachers, public servants and young Canadians who participated in language exchanges. Also, through a number of public interventions, I continued to raise awareness of our language rights and of key official languages issues, such as teaching and education, and the impact of the pandemic on Canada’s official language minority communities. In an effort to reach a more diverse audience, my regional teams was able to take advantage of the digital shift resulting from the pandemic and conducted several new virtual promotional activities across Canada.

We continued to refine our efforts to foster a culture of continuous improvement, collaboration and resource optimization within our organization. Although as an organization we were already well-prepared technologically to work remotely before the pandemic, we have further increased our efforts this past year to provide employees with solutions, tools and equipment to perform their tasks effectively. We also created a centre of excellence for continuous improvement within our organization to provide learning and project support for our employees.

Modernizing the Official Languages Act is of paramount importance me and to my office. We have brought our influence to bear on the federal government by continually strengthening our position on the changes that are needed to make the Act relevant, dynamic and strong. As a consensus-building activity, we conducted consultations with various communities across the country on the official languages reform document the federal government released in February 2021. As part of our parliamentary strategy, I continued in my meetings with parliamentarians to call for swift passage of the bill to modernize the Act.

We are at a critical moment in our Canada’s history. Along with Canadians across the country, my office is keenly looking forward to the promise of a revitalized Official Languages Act. As we move forward, my office is ready to adapt to a modernized Official Languages Act in order to continuously improve our service to Canadians and our work environment.

Raymond Théberge

Results at a glance

Actual spending
Total actual spending for 2020-2021
(dollars)
Actual full-time equivalents
for 2020-2021
22,663,084 168

Core responsibility 1: Protection of official languages rights

  • The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages implemented initiatives to urge federal institutions to break down barriers that are preventing the objectives of the Official Languages Act from being met.
    • Over the past year, it continued its efforts to increase efficiency and innovation in processing the large volume of complaints it receives from Canadians, in particular by developing strategies for managing complaints and intervening with federal institutions on systemic compliance issues related to certain parts of the Official Languages Act.
    • Cross-sectoral initiatives were taken to encourage federal institutions to break down the barriers that are preventing the objectives of the Official Languages Act from being met. These initiatives included three reports titled A Matter of Respect and Safety: The Impact of Emergency Situations on Official Languages, Linguistic (in)security at work – Exploratory survey on official languages among federal government employees in Canada and Implementing Section 91 of the Official Languages Act: A Systemic Problem. The goal of these initiatives was to adopt integrated approaches to manage these issues.
    • The Official Languages Maturity Model was made available to all federal institutions to help them continuously improve their performance in terms of official languages. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, only one federal institution participated in a formal Official Languages Maturity Model exercise in 2020–2021. Since the launch of the Model in 2019, 14 federal institutions have participated in a formal Official Languages Maturity Model exercise.
  • The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages continued to work with federal institutions and with its partners to ensure that the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023: Investing in Our Futureachieves the expected outcomes.
    • It conducted monitoring activities to gather relevant information on programs and investments in the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023: Investing in Our Future to assess progress on their implementation.
    • It established relationships with various stakeholders to obtain their feedback in an effort to assess the situation with regard to both federal institutions and community stakeholders.

Core responsibility 2: Advancement of English and French in Canadian society

  • The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages provided ongoing leadership to ensure that the government effects a true modernization of the Official Languages Act.
    • It took steps to continue to influence the government on the necessary reforms to the Official Languages Act and continued to communicate with various stakeholders in order to build consensus toward achieving a relevant, dynamic and strong act.
    • As part of his parliamentary strategy, the Commissioner of Official Languages made sure to remind the various parliamentarians he met with about the importance of passing a modernized act as soon as possible.

For more information on the Office of the Commissioner of Official Language’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: What we achieved” section of this report.

Results: What we achieved

Core responsibilities

Core responsibility 1: Protection of official languages rights

Description

Under this core responsibility, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages investigates complaints filed by Canadians who believe their language rights have not been respected, assesses compliance with the Official Languages Act by federal institutions and other organizations subject to the Act through performance measurements and audits, and intervenes proactively to prevent non-compliance with the Act. The Commissioner of Official Languages may also intervene before the courts in cases that deal with non-compliance with the Official Languages Act and to protect language rights under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Results

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages received 2,220 complaints over the past year, 1,870 of which were admissible. This is an increase compared with 2019‍–‍2020, when the organization received 1,361 admissible complaints. In addition, it completed 622 investigations and 85 follow-ups to recommendations and commitments made as part of investigations.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages used an integrated approach within its organization to develop strategies to highlight systemic problems related to official languages and thus urge federal institutions to break down the barriers that are preventing the objectives in the Official Languages Act from being met. For example, it published a report in October 2020 called A Matter of Respect and Safety: The Impact of Emergency Situations on Official Languages, which provides an overview of Canadians’ official languages experiences during emergencies that occurred between 2010 and 2020. It also identifies potential solutions to improve the federal government’s compliance with its official languages obligations in its interactions with Canadians.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages also published a report on how section 91 of the Act is implemented in the federal public service. Along with this report, which seeks to find solutions to this problem and to motivate all stakeholders to take a serious look at this issue, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages developed an online tool for the linguistic identification of positions to help managers meet their obligations under the Official Languages Act when staffing positions.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages also continued to work with federal institutions and with its partners to ensure that the Action Plan for Official Languages - 2018–2023: Investing in Our Future achieves the expected outcomes. It has developed integrated strategies for engaging with federal institutions for the benefit of Canadians and with official language minority communities. It held a first round of meetings regarding its activities to monitor the implementation of the action plan. Monitoring was also conducted with federal institutions and stakeholders in the fields of education, immigration, early childhood and the media. The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages organized and participated in upwards of 100 meetings with 81 official language minority community organizations and two federal institutions. Monitoring will continue until the end of the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018‍–‍2023: Investing in Our Future.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages also updated its parliamentary engagement strategy, which it continued to implement.

Finally, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages made the Official Languages Maturity Model available to all federal institutions. Since the launch of the Model in 2019, 14 federal institutions have participated in a formal Official Languages Maturity Model exercise. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, only one federal institution participated in a formal Official Languages Maturity Model exercise in 2020‍–‍2021. This tool helps federal institutions to assess their official languages maturity and should help them make continuous progress in terms of official languages. The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages will continue to offer the tool periodically to all federal institutions subject to the Official Languages Act.

Experimentation

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages continued its reflection on experimentation by focusing its efforts on reviewing its processes. This led, among other things, to a review of the investigation process in order to find solutions to improve the processing of complaints. The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages also analyzed certain types of complaints in order to identify innovative strategies to better meet the needs of complainants and institutions. In addition, it published a tool to help federal institutions address the challenge of establishing the appropriate language requirements of positions under section 91 of the Official Languages Act.

Results achieved

Results achieved
Departmental results Departmental performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018-2019 Actual results 2019-2020 Actual results 2020-2021 Actual results
Official languages rights are protected. Percentage of the Commissioner’s recommendations, made in response to the shortcomings identified through audit and investigation reports, that were implemented 60% March 2021 80% 72% 81%
Official languages rights are protected. Percentage of complaints and enquiries processed within the timelines set out by the service standards 70% March 2021 49% 46% 50%
Canadians benefit from the Commissioner’s interventions before the courts. Percentage of court remedies involving the Commissioner that had a positive impact on the interpretation or application of the Official Languages Act or the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms 60% March 2021 66% 65% 71%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2020–2021
Main Estimates
2020–2021
Planned spending
2020–2021
Total authorities available for use
2020–2021
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2020–2021
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
7,531,284 7,531,284 8,575,089 7,657,634 126,350
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2020–2021
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–2021
Actual full-time equivalents
2020–2021
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
65 67 2

Core responsibility 2: Advancement of English and French in Canadian society

Description

Under this core responsibility, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages works with parliamentarians, federal institutions and other organizations subject to the Official Languages Act, official language minority communities, and Canadians in promoting linguistic duality. It builds ties between federal institutions, official language minority communities and the various levels of government to help them better understand the needs of official language minority communities and the importance of the value of respecting Canada’s linguistic duality. To carry out its promotion role, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages conducts research and studies, undertakes awareness-raising activities with the public and with federal employees, and intervenes with senior federal officials so that they instill a change in culture in order to fully integrate linguistic duality in their organizations.

Results

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages took a number of initiatives to influence the government on the necessary reforms to the Official Languages Act. The Commissioner of Official Languages issued a number of positions on this issue, and messages on modernizing the Official Languages Act were communicated at events in which he participated. Research was also conducted on the issue of administrative tribunals.

Initiatives were taken to continue the dialogue with various stakeholders in order to build consensus toward a vision for a relevant, dynamic and strong Official Languages Act.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages conducted three social media awareness campaigns featuring second language teachers, federal employees and young Canadians across the country who participated in language exchange programs. These campaigns generated a great deal of interest and helped to raise public awareness about the importance of linguistic duality and bilingualism in Canada.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages helped to advance English and French in Canadian society and raise public awareness of language rights through a number of statements and positions issued by the Commissioner of Official Languages over the past year. The Commissioner addressed a variety of issues, including second language instruction and immersion programs, minority-language education, and official languages during the COVID-19 pandemic. He also addressed the issue of modernizing the Official Languages Act several times during the year.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages began refocusing its promotional activities in order to increase its influence on a wider range of audiences over the next three years. At the same time, it adapted several of its activities for the public and for federal employees in order to comply with the restrictions caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages conducted 143 promotional activities during the year, 76% of which were targeted to priority audiences, well above the goal set for the first year of the refocusing exercise.

Experimentation

The Policy and Communications Branch of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages explored more effective ways to engage its various stakeholders. As stated above, it refocused its promotional activities to better target and engage its stakeholders, and it revised the content of the presentations that the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages makes to stakeholders.

Results achieved
Departmental results Departmental performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018-2019 Actual results 2019-2020 Actual results 2020-2021 Actual results
Canadians are aware of their language rights and those of official language minority communities and recognize the importance of linguistic duality and bilingualism. Number of Canadians who have been informed of issues relating to the Official Languages Act 350,000 March 2021 440,074 467,292 443,497
Canadians are aware of their language rights and those of official language minority communities and recognize the importance of linguistic duality and bilingualism. Percentage of Canadians who are in favour of linguistic duality and bilingualism 73% March 2021 Not
availableFootnote 1
Not
availableFootnote 2
Not
availableFootnote 3
The Commissioner influences decision-makers in Parliament, in government and in communities on issues relating to the Official Languages Act. Number of parliamentary proceedings making reference to the Official Languages Act and/or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, specifically its reports and recommendations To be determined March 2021 32 5Footnote 4 99
The Commissioner influences decision-makers in Parliament, in government and in communities on issues relating to the Official Languages Act. Percentage of recommendations from the annual report and research reports prepared by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages that were implemented 60% March 2021 Not
availableFootnote 5
100% Not
availableFootnote 6
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2020-2021
Main Estimates
2020-2021 Planned spending 2020-2021
Total authorities available for use
2020-2021
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2020-2021 Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
7,100,925 7,100,925 8,062,769 6,911,473 (189,452)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2020-2021
Planned full-time equivalents
2020-2021
Actual full-time equivalents
2020-2021
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
56 55 (1)

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are:

  • Acquisition Management Services
  • Communication Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Legal Services
  • Material Management Services
  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Real Property Management Services

However, since court remedies are set out in the Official Languages Act, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ Legal Services are excluded from Internal Services and are an integral part of the language rights protection program. Also, given their specific mandate, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ Communications Services are not included in Internal Services, but are part of the linguistic duality promotion program.

Results

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages is continuing to take steps to foster a culture of continuous improvement, collaboration and resource optimization. It has created a centre of excellence for continuous improvement in order to support the advancement of a culture of continuous improvement and to provide training on continuous improvement, change management and project management. Following the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages reassessed its priorities in light of the new circumstances. It also had to reassess internal risks and put mitigation measures in place. However, given the nature of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ mandate and the transition to a digital work environment for its regular activities, along with the mitigation measures that were put in place, the likelihood of these risks was determined to be low.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages carried out information technology projects to continue to leverage Workplace 2.0 and technologies that will enable it to better support its priorities and mandate while optimizing its resources. However, it had to make adjustments to put in place the new technologies required to better support its employees working remotely. It therefore continued the transition of its CRM platform to MS Dynamics 365, but on a more limited basis in order to work on other priorities. The work will continue in 2021–2022. The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages also updated its infrastructure to meet the urgent need for telework caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. It provided its employees with the equipment they need to work remotely and implemented a new process to enable managers to exercise their financial authority seamlessly. It also developed a tool to facilitate access to its headquarters building during the lockdown period. All of these measures enabled the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages to serve Canadians without interruption.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2020–2021 Main Estimates 2020–2021
Planned spending
2020–2021
Total authorities available for use
2020–2021
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2020–2021 Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
6,885,746 6,885,746 7,536,563 8,093,977 1,208,231
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2020–2021
Planned full-time equivalents
2020–2021
Actual full-time equivalents
2020–2021
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
44 46 2

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory spending) over time.

Organizational spending trend graph (In thousands of dollars)
Organizational spending trend graph (In thousands of dollars)
  2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23 2023-24
Total 21,903 21,631 21,518 21,510 21,463 21,594
Voted 19,746 19,448 19,299 19,291 19,255 19,404
Statutory 2,157 2,183 2,219 2,219 2,208 2,190
Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2020–2021
Main Estimates
2020–2021
Planned spending
2021–2022
Planned spending
2022–2023
Planned spending
2020–2021
Total authorities available for use
2018–2019
Actual spending (authorities used)
2019–2020
Actual spending (authorities used)
2020–2021
Actual spending (authorities used)
Protection of Official Languages Rights 7,531,284 7,531,284 7,772,181 7,755,975 8,575,089 7,935,758 7,427,123 7,657,634
Advancement of French and English in Canadian society 7,100,925 7,100,925 7,328,057 7,312,777 8,062,769 7,199,161 6,905,267 6,911,473
Subtotal 14,632,209 14,632,209 15,100,238 15,068,752 16,637,858 15,134,919 14,332,390 14,569,107
Internal Services 6,885,746 6,885,746 7,105,994 7,091,177 7,536,563 6,767,601 7,298,850 8,093,977
Total 21,517,955 21,517,955 22,206,232 22,159,929 24,174,421 21,902,520 21,631,240 22,663,084

For fiscal years 2018-19 to 2020–21, actual spending matches actual spending as reported in the Public Accounts of Canada. The amounts shown for the 2021-22 to 2022-23 periods represent planned spending.

The $2.7M increase between total authorities available for use in 2020-21 ($24.2M) and planned spending for 2020-21 ($21.5M) is due to funding received through the operating budget carry-forward exercise, compensation related to the new collective agreements and adjustments to the employee benefit plans.

The increase in actual spending in 2020-21 ($22.7M) compared with 2019-20 ($21.6M) is mainly due to an increase in full-time equivalents in 2020-21, as shown in the Actual human resources table, and to retroactive payments issued following the signing of new labour agreements.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2018-2019
Actual full-time equivalents
2019-2020
Actual full-time equivalents
2020-2021
Planned full-time equivalents
2020-2021
Actual full-time equivalents
2021-2022
Planned full-time equivalents
2022-2023
Planned full-time equivalents
Protection of Official Languages Rights 70 66 65 67 64 64
Advancement of English and French in Canadian society 56 56 56 55 57 57
Subtotal 126 122 121 122 121 121
Internal Services 42 43 44 46 45 45
Total 168 165 165 168 166 166

Expenditures by vote

For information on the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ organizational voted and statutory expenditures, see the Public Accounts of Canada 2020–2021.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statement highlights

Financial statements

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2021.

Financial statement highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ending March 31, 2021 (dollars)
Financial information  2020-2021
Planned results
2020-2021 Actual results  2019-2020 Actual results Difference (2020-2021 actual results minus 2020-2021 planned results) Difference (2020-2021 actual results minus 2019-2020 actual results)
Total expenses 24,945,017 26,823,739 25,252,304 1,878,722 1,571,435
Total revenues - - - - -
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 24,945,017 26,823,739 25,252,304 1,878,722 1,571,435
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2021 (dollars)
Financial information 2020-2021 2019-2020 Difference
(2020-2021 minus
2019-2020)
Total net liabilities 3,332,071 3,609,987 (277,916)
Total net financial assets 1,772,814 2,332,481 (559,667)
Office of the Commissioner’s net debt 1,559,257 1,277,506 281,751
Total non-financial assets 1,593,925 1,972,826 (378,901)
Office of the Commissioner’s net financial position 34,668 695,320 (660,652)
Assets by type
Assets by type
Assets Prepaid expenses Consolidated Revenue Fund Accounts receivable and advances Tangible capital assets
Percentage (%) 1% 47% 6% 46%

Total assets were $3,366,739 at the end of 2020–21, representing a decrease of $938,568 (22%) from the previous year’s total assets of $4,305,307. Of that amount, tangible capital assets represented $1,548,517 (46%) and the Consolidated Revenue Fund totalled $1,586,450 (47%). Accounts receivable and advances, and prepaid expenses accounted for 6% and 1% of total assets, respectively.

Liabilites by type
Liabilites by type
Liabilites Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Accrued salaries Vacation pay and compensatory leave Employee future benefits
Percentage (%) 12% 40% 42% 6%

Total liabilities were $3,332,071 at the end of 2020–21, a decrease of $205,921 (6%) from the previous year’s $3,353,992. Accounts payable and accrued liabilities as well as accrued salaries represented the largest portion of the total liabilities, at $1,724,779 (52%). Vacation leave and compensatory leave, and employee future benefits accounted for 42% and 6% of total liabilities, respectively.

Expenses - Where funds go
Expenses - Where funds go
Expenses Protection of linguistic rights Advancement of English and French in Canadian society Internal services
Percentage (%) 35% 32% 33%

The Office of the Commissioner’s total expenses were $26,823,739 in 2020–21, of which the majority of the funds were spent on the Office of the Commissioner’s programs ($17,175,469), while internal services represented $9,648,270, or 36%, of total expenses.

Additional information

Organizational profile

Commissioner of Official Languages:
Raymond Théberge
Enabling instrument:
Subsection 56(1) of the Official Languages Act
Year of incorporation/ commencement:
1970
Other:
The Commissioner of Official Languages is appointed by commission under the Great Seal, after approval by resolution of the House of Commons and the Senate. The Commissioner reports directly to Parliament.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: Who we are and what we do

Raison d’être, mandate and role: Who we are and what we do” is available on the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ website.

Operational context

Information on the operating context is available on the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ website.

Reporting framework

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2020–2021 are shown below.

Graphical presentation of Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory
Graphical presentation of Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory, text version below.
Text version of Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory
  • Departmental Results Framework
    • Core Responsibility: Protection of rights related to official languages
      • Rights related of official languages are protected
        • Percentage of the Commissioner’s recommendations made in response to deficiencies identified through audit and investigation reports that have been implemented.
        • Percentage of complaints and inquiries processed within the timelines set out by the service standards.
      • Canadians benefit from the Commissioner’s interventions before the courts.
        • Percentage of remedies involving the Commissioner that had a positive impact on the interpretation or the application of the Official Languages Act or the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
    • Core Responsibility: Advancement of English and French in Canadian society
      • Canadians know their language rights and those of official language minority communities and they recognize the importance of linguistic duality and bilingualism.
        • Number of Canadians who have been informed of issues relating to the Official Languages Act.
        • Percentage of public support for linguistic duality and bilingualism.
      • The Commissioner influences decision-makers in Parliament, government and communities on issues relating to the Official Languages Act.
        • Number of parliamentary deliberations making reference to the Official Languages Act and/or reports and recommendations of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.
        • Proportion of recommendations from the annual report and research reports prepared by the Office of the Commissioner that were implemented.
  • Internal Services
  • Program Inventory
    • Core Responsibility: Rights related to official languages are protected
      • Protection of Official Languages Rights
    • Core Responsibility: Advancement of English and French in Canadian society
      • Advancement of Official Languages

Supporting information on the program inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Scope and Context

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages (OCOL) procures over $5 million in goods and services per year, in multiple commodity categories. Although greening of our procurement can be integrated throughout our activities, OCOL is focusing on three prospective areas for greening its procurement: using standing offers for purchase of goods; replacing desktop computers with laptops to reduce energy consumption; and using recycled photocopy paper.

 

Performance Measurement
Expected result

Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of goods and services.

Performance indicator Targeted performance results
Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place. OCOL has integrated green procurement criteria in its procurement request forms.
Number and percentage of specialists in procurement and/or materiel management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course or equivalent, in 2020-21. 2
100%
Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes 9support and contribution towards green procurement, in 2020-21. 0
0%
Departmental green procurement target

Regular use of standing offers for purchasing office equipment that is environment friendly.

Performance indicator Targeted performance level
All requests for office equipment to be processed by the Procurement Section. 100%
Departmental green procurement target

Reduce energy consumption by replacing desktop computers with laptops

Performance indicator Targeted performance level
Desktop computers have been replaced by laptops for all employees. 100%
Departmental green procurement target

Use of photocopy paper with a 30% recycled content.

Performance indicator Targeted performance level
All photocopy paper purchased has 30% recycled content. 95%
Achieved
Implementation strategy element or best practice Targeted performance level
7.2.1.5. Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible. Achieved

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

For further information, contact us.

Appendix: definitions

appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
core responsibility
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
departmental priority
A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.
departmental result
A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
departmental result indicator
A quantitative measure of progress on a departmental result.
departmental results framework
A framework that connects the department’s core responsibilities to its departmental results and departmental result indicators.
Departmental Results Report
A report on a department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation
The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works, for whom and in what circumstances. Experimentation is related to, but distinct from innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.
full-time equivalent
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. For a particular position, the full‑time equivalent figure is the ratio of number of hours the person actually works divided by the standard number of hours set out in the person’s collective agreement.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities
For the purpose of the 2019–20 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2019 Speech from the Throne, namely: Fighting climate change; Strengthening the Middle Class; Walking the road of reconciliation; Keeping Canadians safe and healthy; and Positioning Canada for success in an uncertain world.
horizontal initiative
An initiative where two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non-budgetary expenditures
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
program
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
program inventory
Identifies all the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s core responsibilities and results.
result
A consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
target
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an appropriation act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
Date modified:
2022-02-01