2019–20 Departmental Results Report

 

The original version was signed by:

The Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, P.C., Q.C., M.P.
President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada

 

Commissioner’s message

Raymond Théberge

I am pleased to report on my office’s activities and results over the past year, which have been guided by the vision I established at the beginning of my mandate to:

  • urge federal institutions to break down the barriers that are preventing the objectives of the Official Languages Act from being met;
  • work with federal institutions and partners to ensure that the Action Plan for Official Languages – 2018-2023: Investing in our Future achieves the expected outcomes;
  • call on the federal government to provide ongoing leadership to undertake a meaningful modernization of the Official Languages Act; and
  • foster a culture of continuous improvement, collaboration and optimization of resources within the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

This year has been one of exploration and change for our organization, as we strive to work more efficiently and collaboratively and develop innovative approaches for protecting official languages rights and advancing English and French in Canadian society.

We have made innovations to our complaint process to address the large volume of official languages–related complaints we received from Canadians over the past year. By developing efficient complaint management strategies and identifying systemic compliance issues in certain sectors, we are able to carry out targeted interventions to assist federal institutions in improving their compliance with the Official Languages Act.

Last year, we launched the Official Languages Maturity Model, an on-line diagnostic tool developed by my office to help federal institutions continuously improve their official languages performance. We have offered the tool, along with guided assistance from our experts, to 12 federal institutions over the past year.

We continue to build relationships with various stakeholders to obtain their feedback on the evolution of the Action Plan for Official Languagesin federal institutions and in communities across Canada.

Over the past year, we undertook a review of the programs and investments that fall under the Action Plan for Official Languages and developed a dashboard that will enable us to analyze the implementation status of the initiatives over the duration of the Plan. We have seized opportunities to raise awareness within the federal government and in Canadian society of the need to modernize the Official Languages Act so that it is relevant, dynamic and strong.

Beyond the release of my position paper in May 2019, which included 18 recommendations to the Government, I took the opportunity to reach out to parliamentarians to reiterate the importance of modernizing the Act following the federal election in the fall.

As part of our efforts to raise awareness of the importance of linguistic duality and bilingualism in Canada, I spoke out on a number of issues that impact Canadians in their daily lives, including my public statements on the National Public Alerting System and on government communications during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The year 2019 marked the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act. In collaboration with stakeholders, we organized a summit, Officially 50! in the fall that brought together over 200 participants, including youth, parents, educators and researchers from across Canada to collectively reflect on the future of official languages.

Over the past year, we also successfully launched a campaign on social media to highlight the insights and contributions of second-language teachers in Canada. To further innovate within our role to advance English and French in Canadian society, we have developed a new approach for our promotional activities to have a greater impact among diverse audiences over the next three years.

In line with our desire to optimize resources, we have developed frameworks for project management and for collaboration across the organization. We have also created a centre of expertise for continuous improvement to provide training to employees and share best practices. We continue to leverage our technology and provide our staff with the tools required to work efficiently and collaborate effectively, which has enabled us to maintain business continuity during the COVID-19 pandemic. The full impact of the pandemic remains to be seen, but there is no question that it has brought greater pressures to both federal institutions and official language communities across Canada.

More than ever, the coming months and years will require a sustained leadership and commitment on behalf of the federal government in order to ensure that Canadians’ language rights are respected, and that the vitality of official language communities is safeguarded. As Commissioner of Official Languages, I will continue to monitor the situation and intervene as appropriate to ensure that Canadians’ fundamental language rights are protected.

Raymond Théberge

Results at a glance and operating context

Actual spending
Total actual spending for 2019-2020
(dollars)
Actual full-time equivalents
for 2019-2020
$21,631,240 165

Core Responsibility 1: Protection of Official Languages Rights

  • The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has implemented initiatives to encourage federal institutions to break down barriers to achieving the objectives of the Official Languages Act.
    • The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages continued its efforts to efficiently and innovatively handle the many complaints received from Canadians over the past year, in particular by developing strategies for managing complaints and taking action with federal institutions on systemic compliance issues related to certain parts of the Official Languages Act.
    • Cross-sectoral initiatives were implemented to facilitate collaboration on official languages issues, namely through the development of a mechanism for identifying and prioritizing issues. The goal of these initiatives is to adopt integrated approaches to managing these issues.
    • The Official Languages Maturity Model, developed by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, was made available to 12 federal institutions to help them continuously improve their official languages performance.
  • The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has intervened with federal institutions and partners to ensure that the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023: Investing in Our Future achieves the expected outcomes.
    • The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages conducted monitoring activities to gather relevant information on programs and investments in the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023 to assess progress on their implementation.
    • The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has been in contact with various stakeholders to obtain their feedback in an effort to assess the situation with regard to both federal institutions and community stakeholders.

Core Responsibility 2: Advancement of English and French in Canadian society

  • The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has provided ongoing leadership to ensure that the government truly modernizes the Official Languages Act.
    • The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has taken steps to influence the government on the necessary reforms to the Official Languages Act and has maintained a dialogue with various stakeholders in order to build consensus toward achieving a relevant, dynamic and strong act.
    • As part of his parliamentary strategy, the Commissioner made sure to remind the various parliamentarians he met with about the importance of promptly passing modernized legislation.

For more information on the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report

Results: what we achieved

Core Responsibilities

Core resposibility 1: Protection of Official Languages Rights

Description

Under this core responsibility, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages investigates complaints filed by Canadians who believe their language rights have not been respected, assesses compliance with the Official Languages Act by federal institutions and other organizations subject to the Act through performance measurements and audits, and intervenes proactively to prevent non-compliance with the Act. As well, the Commissioner may intervene before the courts in cases that deal with non-compliance with the Official Languages Act and to protect language rights under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

Results

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages received 1,361 complaints over the past year, which led to 976 investigations. Moreover, it completed 697 investigations and 127 follow-ups to recommendations made as part of investigations.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages urged federal institutions to break down the barriers preventing the objectives of the Official Languages Act from being met by developing—using an integrated approach within its organization—intervention strategies for select federal institutions, such as the integrated strategy for intervention with Elections Canada.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages also intervened with federal institutions and partners to ensure that the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018−2023 achieves the expected outcomes. Accordingly, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has developed integrated strategies for engaging with federal institutions for the benefit of Canadians, and with official language minority communities. To this end, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has developed a monitoring dashboard to collect relevant information on programs and investments in the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023 and to review the status of their implementation. Federal institutions and education and media stakeholders were monitored; oversight will continue until the end of the current Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023. The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has also implemented a parliamentary engagement strategy for the new government elected in 2019.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages also focused on reviewing its processes in order to continue thinking about ways to innovate and optimize those processes wherever possible. For example, the complaints-management aspect of the section 91 complaints strategy has yielded an improved process for responding to recurring complaints relating to this section, thus enabling the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages to better understand the ever-changing complaints landscape.

Finally, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages offered a new tool—the Official Languages Maturity Model—available to 12 federal institutions. This tool has helped federal institutions assess their official languages maturity and should help them make continuous progress on official languages. The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages will continue to offer the tool on a periodic basis to all federal institutions subject to the Act.

Results achieved
Departmental results Departmental performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017-2018 Actual results 2018-2019 Actual results 2019-2020 Actual results
Official languages rights are protected. Percentage of the Commissioner’s recommendations, made in response to the gaps identified through audit and investigation reports, that were implemented. 60% March 2020 Not availableFootnote 1 80% 72%
Official languages rights are protected. Percentage of complaints and enquiries processed within the timelines set out by the service standards. 70% March 2020 Not availableFootnote 2 49% 46%Footnote 3
Canadians benefit from the Commissioner’s interventions before the courts. Percentage of court remedies involving the Commissioner that had a positive impact on the interpretation or application of the Official Languages Act or the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. 60% March 2020 75% 66% 65%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019–2020
Main Estimates
2019–2020
Planned spending
2019–2020
Total authorities available for use
2019–2020
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2019–2020
Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
7,588,107 7,588,107 7,698,344 7,427,123 (160,984)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019–2020
Planned full-time equivalents
2019–2020
Actual full-time equivalents
2019–2020
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
65 66 1

Core responsibility 2: Advancement of English and French in Canadian society

Description

Under this core responsibility, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages works with parliamentarians, federal institutions and other organizations subject to the Official Languages Act, official language communities and Canadians in promoting linguistic duality. The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages builds ties between federal institutions, official language communities and the various levels of government to help them better understand the needs of official language communities and the importance of the value of respecting Canada’s linguistic duality. To carry out its promotion role, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages conducts research, studies and public awareness activities and intervenes with senior federal officials so that they instill a change in culture in order to fully integrate linguistic duality in their organizations.

Results

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages took a number of initiatives that aim to influence the government on the necessary reforms to the Official Languages Act. The Commissioner took position on the issue, and messaging on modernizing the Act was communicated at events in which he participated. Research was also done on the issue of administrative tribunals.

Initiatives were also implemented to continue a dialogue with the various stakeholders in order to build consensus toward the vision for a relevant, dynamic and strong act. One such forward-looking event was the Officially 50! summit, held November 21–23, 2019, in partnership with the Association for Canadian Studies and Canadian Parents for French. The event, which celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Official Languages Act, brought together nearly 200 people, including some 40 young people from across the country.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages conducted a social media awareness campaign on second-language education, featuring second-language teachers from across Canada. The campaign generated significant interest and helped raise public awareness of the importance of linguistic duality and bilingualism in Canada.

Furthermore, through a number of statements by the Commissioner over the past year on various official languages issues, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has helped advance English and French in Canadian society and raise public awareness of language rights. This was especially the case with the Commissioner’s statements on the National Public Alerting System on November 19, 2019, and official languages during the COVID-19 pandemic on March 20, 2020. The Commissioner also participated in 62 meetings with various regional stakeholders.

Finally, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages began refocusing its promotional activities in order to increase its influence on a wider range of audiences over the next three years.

Results achieved
Departmental results Departmental performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017-2018 Actual results 2018-2019 Actual results 2019-2020 Actual results
Canadians are aware of their language rights and those of official language minority communities and recognize the importance of linguistic duality and bilingualism. Number of Canadians who have been informed of issues relating to the Official Languages Act. 350,000 March 2020 Not availableFootnote 4 440,074 467,292
Canadians are aware of their language rights and those of official language minority communities and recognize the importance of linguistic duality and bilingualism. Percentage of Canadians who are in favour of linguistic duality and bilingualism 73% March 2021 Not availableFootnote 5 Not availableFootnote 6 Not availableFootnote 7
The Commissioner influences decision-makers in Parliament, in government and in communities on issues relating to the Official Languages Act. Number of parliamentary proceedings making reference to the Official Languages Act and/or the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, specifically its reports and recommendations. To be determined by March 2021 March 2020 Not availableFootnote 8 32 5Footnote 9
The Commissioner influences decision-makers in Parliament, in government and in communities on issues relating to the Official Languages Act. Percentage of recommendations from the Annual Report and research reports prepared by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages that were implemented. 60% March 2020 Not availableFootnote 10 N/AFootnote 11 100%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019-2020
Main Estimates
2019-2020 Planned spending 2019-2020
Total authorities available for use
2019-2020
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2019-2020 Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
7,154,501 7,154,501 7,471,922 6,905,267 (249,234)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019-2020
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-2020
Actual full-time equivalents
2019-2020
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
56 56 0

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are:

  • Acquisition Management Services
  • Communication Services
  • Financial Management Services
  • Human Resources Management Services
  • Information Management Services
  • Information Technology Services
  • Legal Services
  • Material Management Services
  • Management and Oversight Services
  • Real Property Management Services

However, since court remedies are set out in the Official Languages Act, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ Legal Services are excluded from Internal Services and are an integral part of the language rights protection program. Also, given their specific mandate, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ Communications Services are not included in Internal Services, but are part of the linguistic duality promotion program.

Results

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages has taken steps to foster a culture of continuous improvement, collaboration and resource optimization.

Consequently, to better align work and results and thus optimize its resources, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages adopted a governance structure for implementation of the Vision 2025 strategic plan; a framework for collaboration and cooperation within the organization, including an inventory of tools that promote collaboration and cooperation; and a project management and continuous improvement framework.

Moreover, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages created a centre of excellence for continuous improvement with a view to fostering employee engagement by building on multidisciplinary skills and encouraging innovation and employee development to instill a culture of continuous improvement and increased collaboration.

Finally, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages implemented information technology projects to leverage Workplace 2.0 and technologies that will enable it to better support its priorities and mandate, while optimizing its resources. The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages upgraded its CRM platform to Dynamic 365, replaced all of its laptops, implemented a cloud-based e-mail solution (Exchange Online) and instant messaging platform (Skype for Business Online), and increased bandwidth for remote access users.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019-2020 Main Estimates 2019-2020
Planned spending
2019-2020
Total authorities available for use
2019-2020
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2019-2020 Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
6,937,697 6,937,697 7,471,922 7,298,850 361,153
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019-2020
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-2020
Actual full-time equivalents
2019-2020
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
44 43 (1)

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory spending) over time.

Departmental spending trend graph (In thousands of dollars)
Departmental spending trend graph (In thousands of dollars)
  2017-18 2018-19 2019-20 2020-21 2021-22 2022-23
Total 21,047 21,903 21,631 21,518 21,510 21,463
Voted 18,928 19,746 19,448 19,299 19,291 19,255
Statutory 2,119 2,157 2,183 2,219 2,219 2,208
Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2019–2020
Main Estimates
2019–2020
Planned spending
2020–2021
Planned spending
2021–2022
Planned spending
2019–2020
Total authorities available for use
2017–2018
Actual spending (authorities used)
2018–2019 Actual spending (authorities used) 2019–2020
Actual spending (authorities used)
Protection of Official Languages Rights 7,588,107 7,588,107 7,531,284 7,528,394 7,698,344 7,468,645 7,935,758 7,427,123
Advancement of French and English in Canadian society 7,154,501 7,154,501 7,100,925 7,098,200 7,471,922 7,403,591 7,199,161 6,905,267
Subtotal 14,742,608 14,742,608 14,632,209 14,626,594 15,170,266 14,872,236 15,134,919 14,332,390
Internal Services 6,937,697 6,937,697 6,885,746 6,883,103 7,471,922 6,175,354 6,767,601 7,298,850
Total 21,680,305 21,680,305 21,517,955 21,509,697 22,642,188 21,047,590 21,902,520 21,631,240

For fiscal years 2017–2018 to 2019–2020, actual spending matches actual spending as reported in the Public Accounts of Canada. The amounts shown for the 2020–2021 to 2021–2022 periods represent planned spending.

The $0.9M increase between total authorities available for use ($22.6M) in 2019–2020 and planned spending ($21.7M) for 2019–2020 is due to funding received through the operating budget carry-forward exercise, compensation related to the new collective agreements and adjustments to the employee benefit plans.

The decrease in actual spending in 2019–2020 ($21.6M) compared with 2018–2019 ($21.9M) is mainly due to an increase in full-time equivalents in 2018–2019, as shown in the Actual human resources table, and to retroactive payments issued to management following the signing of new labour agreements.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2017-2018
Actual full-time equivalents
2018-2019
Actual full-time equivalents
2019-2020
Planned full-time equivalents
2019-2020
Actual full-time equivalents
2020-2021
Planned full-time equivalents
2021-2022
Planned full-time equivalents
Protection of Official Languages Rights 65 70 65 66 65 65
Advancement of English and French in Canadian society 53 56 56 56 56 56
Subtotal 118 126 121 122 121 121
Internal Services 41 42 44 43 44 44
Total 159 168 165 165 165 165

Expenditures by vote

For information on the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2019–2020.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ financial statements (audited) for the year ended March 31, 2020.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited)Footnote 12 for the year ended March 31, 2020 (dollars)
Financial information  2019-2020
Planned results
2019-2020 Actual results  2018-2019 Actual results Difference (2019-2020 actual results minus 2019-2020 planned results) Difference (2019-2020 actual results minus 2018-2019 actual results)
Total expenses 25,224,894 25,134,309 24,751,872 (90,585) 382,437
Total revenues - - - - -
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 25,224,894 25,134,309 24,751,872 (90,585) 382,437
Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2020 (dollars)
Financial information 2019-2020 2018-2019 Difference
(2019-2020 minus
2018-2019)
Total net liabilities 3,537,992 4,094,015 (556,023)
Total net financial assets 2,332,481 2,968,344 (635,863)
Office of the Commissioner’s net debt 1,205,511 1,125,671 79,840
Total non-financial assets 1,972,826 2,124,042 (151,216)
Office of the Commissioner’s net financial position 767,315 998,371 (231,056)
Assets by type
Assets by type
Assets Consolidated Revenue Fund Accounts receivable and advances Prepaid expenses Tangible capital assets
Percentage (%) 40% 14% 2% 44%
 

Total assets were $4,305,307 at the end of 2019-20, representing a decrease of $787,079 (15%) from the previous year’s total assets of $5,092,386. Of that amount, tangible capital assets represented $ 1,911,674 (44%) and the Consolidated Revenue Fund totalled $1,725,940 (40%). Accounts receivable and advances, and prepaid expenses accounted for 14% and 2% of total assets, respectively.

Liabilites by type
Liabilites by type
Liabilites Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Accrued salaries Vacation pay and compensatory leave Employee future benefits
Percentage (%) 24% 42% 29% 5%
 

Total liabilities were $3,537,992 at the end of 2019-20, a decrease of $556,023 (14%) from the previous year’s $4,094,015. Accounts payable and accrued liabilities as well as accrued salaries represented the largest portion of the total liabilities, at $2,317,893 (66%). Vacation leave and compensatory leave, and employee future benefits accounted for 29% and 5% of total liabilities, respectively.

Expenses - Where funds go
Expenses - Where funds go
Expenses Protection of linguistic rights Advancement of English and French in Canadian society Internal services
Percentage (%) 35% 32% 33%
 

The Office of the Commissioner’s total expenses were $25,134,309 in 2019-20. The lion’s share of the funds was spent on the Office of the Commissioner’s programs ($16,883,587), while internal services represented $8,250,722, or 33%, of total expenses.

Additional information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Commissioner of Official Languages:
Raymond Théberge
Enabling instrument:
Subsection 56(1) of the Official Languages Act
Year of incorporation/ commencement:
1970
Other:
The Commissioner of Official Languages is appointed by commission under the Great Seal, after approval by resolution of the House of Commons and the Senate. The Commissioner reports directly to Parliament.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ website.

Reporting Framework

The Office of the Commissioner’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2019–20 are shown below.

Graphical presentation of Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory
Graphical presentation of Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory, text version below.
Text version of Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory
  • Departmental Results Framework
    • Core Responsibility: Protection of rights related to official languages
      • Rights related of official languages are protected
        • Percentage of the Commissioner’s recommendations made in response to deficiencies identified through audit and investigation reports that have been implemented.
        • Percentage of complaints and inquiries processed within the timelines set out by the service standards.
      • Canadians benefit from the Commissioner’s interventions before the courts.
        • Percentage of remedies involving the Commissioner that had a positive impact on the interpretation or the application of the Official Languages Act or the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
    • Core Responsibility: Advancement of English and French in Canadian society
      • Canadians know their language rights and those of official language minority communities and they recognize the importance of linguistic duality and bilingualism.
        • Number of Canadians who have been informed of issues relating to the Official Languages Act.
        • Percentage of public support for linguistic duality and bilingualism.
      • The Commissioner influences decision-makers in Parliament, government and communities on issues relating to the Official Languages Act.
        • Number of parliamentary deliberations making reference to the Official Languages Act and/or reports and recommendations of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.
        • Proportion of recommendations from the annual report and research reports prepared by the Office of the Commissioner that were implemented.
  • Internal Services
  • Program Inventory
    • Core Responsibility: Rights related to official languages are protected
      • Protection of Official Languages Rights
    • Core Responsibility: Advancement of English and French in Canadian society
      • Advancement of Official Languages

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Office of the Comissioner's Program Inventory is avaliable in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Scope and Context

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages (OCOL) procures over $5 million in goods and services per year, in multiple commodity categories. Although greening of our procurement can be integrated throughout our activities, OCOL is focusing on three prospective areas for greening its procurement: using standing offers for purchase of goods; replacing desktop computers with laptops to reduce energy consumption; and using recycled photocopy paper.

 

Performance Measurement
Expected result

Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of goods and services.

Performance indicator Targeted performance results
Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place. OCOL has integrated green procurement criteria in its procurement request forms.
Number and percentage of specialists in procurement and/or materiel management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course or equivalent, in 2019-20. 2
100%
Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes 9support and contribution towards green procurement, in 2019-20. 0
0%
Departmental green procurement target

Regular use of standing offers for purchasing office equipment that is environment friendly.

Performance indicator Targeted performance level
All requests for office equipment to be processed by the Procurement Section. 100%
Departmental green procurement target

Reduce energy consumption by replacing desktop computers with laptops

Performance indicator Targeted performance level
Desktop computers have been replaced by laptops for all employees. 100%
Departmental green procurement target

Use of photocopy paper with a 30% recycled content.

Performance indicator Targeted performance level
All photocopy paper purchased has 30% recycled content. 95%
Achieved
Implementation strategy element or best practice Targeted performance level
7.2.1.5. Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible. Achieved

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

For further information, contact us.

Appendix: definitions

appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
core responsibility
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
departmental priority
A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.
departmental result
A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
departmental result indicator
A quantitative measure of progress on a departmental result.
departmental results framework
A framework that connects the department’s core responsibilities to its departmental results and departmental result indicators.
Departmental Results Report
A report on a department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation
The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works, for whom and in what circumstances. Experimentation is related to, but distinct from innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.
full-time equivalent
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. For a particular position, the full‑time equivalent figure is the ratio of number of hours the person actually works divided by the standard number of hours set out in the person’s collective agreement.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities
For the purpose of the 2019–20 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2019 Speech from the Throne, namely: Fighting climate change; Strengthening the Middle Class; Walking the road of reconciliation; Keeping Canadians safe and healthy; and Positioning Canada for success in an uncertain world.
horizontal initiative
An initiative where two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non-budgetary expenditures
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
program
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
program inventory
Identifies all the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s core responsibilities and results.
result
A consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
target
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an appropriation act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
Date modified:
2022-02-01