2017–18 Departmental Results Report

 

The original version was signed by:

The Honourable Dominic LeBlanc, P.C., Q.C., M.P.
President of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada

 

Message from the Commissioner of Official Languages of Canada

Raymond Théberge

I am honoured to present my first Departmental Report on Results which marks the end of a year of transition, celebration and renewal.

It was obvious to me upon my arrival in January 2018 that, in the 13 months preceding my arrival, Interim Commissioner Saikaley and the team performed their duties with professionalism, commitment and integrity—qualities that are vital for keeping our organization running smoothly and effectively. I am privileged to have inherited a strong, healthy organization replete with dedicated professionals who are passionate about the mandate of this office.

Leading up to the Canada 150 celebrations, the Office of the Commissioner’s many activities prompted federal institutions to focus their attention on official languages, a matter of key importance in a year when all eyes were on celebrations commemorating the anniversary. The Office was proactive and engaged with federal institutions, committees responsible for organizing large-scale events, and parliamentarians who were called upon to represent the government at public events across the country.

In the past year, we received a total of 894 admissible complaints, of which more than half were about services to the public. The Office also held observations of the 10 federal institutions that have a key role in service delivery to assess their compliance related to services and communications with the public (Part IV).

In an effort to continuously improve on its businesses processes, my office started working on a maturity model for federal institutions which is intended to help them enhance their official languages performance. Distinct from government assessment tools currently being used, this tool will provide each institution that uses the model with the opportunity to follow its own process in order to achieve its official languages goals.

I am encouraged with the advancements being made in the review of the modernization of the Official Languages (Communications with and Services to the Public) Regulations and the Official Languages Act. The Act, which will be turning 50 in 2019, needs to be updated to reflect changes in Canadian society. My office therefore redoubled its efforts in early 2018 to ensure ongoing discussions with key stakeholders, both in official language minority communities and in the public service, and to ensure that the work already under way continues.

The long awaited renewal of the Action Plan for Official Languages 2018–2023: Investing in Our Future, is of vital importance to the support of official languages and official language minority communities which is why my office will monitor its implementation to ensure that progress is made in areas that have a major impact on communities, such as immigration, early childhood development, and access to justice.

Over the next seven years, I will be steadfast in my objective to see the Official Languages Act modified so that it better reflects today’s Canada.  I also commit to use all of the means at my disposal to ensure that official languages and linguistic duality continue to be a fundamentally Canadian value.

Raymond Théberge

Results at a glance

Actual spending
Total actual spending for 2017-18 (dollars) Total actual full-time equivalents for 2017-18
21,047,590 159
  • Program 1.1: Protection of Language Rights
  • Program 1.2: Promotion of Linguistic Duality

Priority: Leverage Canada’s 150th anniversary to heighten the centrality of Canada’s linguistic duality and the need to reflect on the future of the Canadian language policy.

  • As part of the 150th anniversary activities in 2017, the Office of the Commissioner organized a conference to promote linguistic duality. It also worked to engage the public and institutions, in person and on-line.
  • Targeted prevention initiatives and the Office of the Commissioner’s discussions with federal institutions and key official languages stakeholders have had a positive impact on the protection of language rights and on linguistic duality in Canadian society.
  • The Office of the Commissioner worked with key stakeholders involved in modernizing the Regulations on communications and services.
  • In the context of the 50th anniversary of the Act in 2019, the Office of the Commissioner took a position on the key elements of a reform of the Act, particularly considering the impact of digital technology, and held consultations on the issue.
  • We followed up on studies and launched new studies. We also took positions on a number of issues that affect official languages and followed up extensively on report recommendations.
  • New complaint management strategies were developed.

For more information on the Office of Commissioner of Official Languages’ plans, priorities and results achieved, please see the “Results: What we achieved” section of this report.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

The Commissioner of Official Languages has to oversee the full implementation of the Official Languages Act, protect the language rights of Canadians, and promote linguistic duality.

Mandate and role

Section 56 of the Official Languages Act states:

It is the duty of the Commissioner to take all actions and measures within the authority of the Commissioner with a view to ensuring recognition of the status of each of the official languages and compliance with the spirit and intent of this Act in the administration of the affairs of federal institutions, including any of their activities relating to the advancement of English and French in Canadian society.

Under the Act, therefore, the Commissioner is required to take every measure within his or her power to ensure that the three main objectives of the Official Languages Act are met:

  • the equality of the status and use of English and French in Parliament, the Government of Canada, the federal administration and the institutions subject to the Act;
  • the development of official language communities in Canada; and
  • the advancement of the equality of English and French in Canadian society.

For more general information about the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, please see the “Supplementary information” section of this report.

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

In 2017–18, while awaiting the arrival of a new commissioner, the Interim Commissioner undertook a vision exercise. After being appointed, the new commissioner committed to completing the work and thereby helping the organization establish a vision for the next seven years (Vision 2025). The work is expected to be completed in fall 2018–19.

Under the Interim Commissioner’s leadership, and after the arrival of Commissioner Raymond Théberge on January 28, 2018, a number of events sparked a broader conversation around official languages issues. These events included: the government’s preparation of the next action plan for official languages; the plan’s release on March 28, 2018; the next steps required in response to the report to the Clerk of the Privy Council on language of work in the public service; discussions in Parliament on the modernization of the Official Languages Act; the modernization of the Official Languages (Communications with and Services to the Public) Regulations; and the crisis in community media. The 150th anniversary of Confederation festivities also encouraged many Canadians to reflect on the role of linguistic duality in the country’s development and future.

The Office of the Commissioner played an active role in these various conversations with federal institutions, the Canadian public and official language communities. It investigated some 894 new complaints, and held a conference on the future of linguistic duality in six cities simultaneously on November 30, 2017. It also made 15 parliamentary appearances, during which a number of upcoming challenges were discussed.

The dynamics of official languages at the national level are complex. These dynamics are the focus of political and administrative interactions with provincial and territorial governments and community groups that are demanding a larger role in the management of support programs. Events such as the changes to Manitoba’s Bureau de l’éducation française, the debates on the place of French-as-a-second-language instruction in a number of regions nationwide and the establishment of a secretariat to liaise with Quebec’s English-speaking communities all have an impact on the federal scene and on the Commissioner’s work.

Indigenous languages have taken their rightful place among the government’s priorities. Official languages and Indigenous languages are separate issues, but they affect each other at the political and public-opinion level. The Office of the Commissioner addressed the matter during public consultations on the modernization of the Act and as part of its project on the Office of the Commissioner’s presence in the northern territories.

In September 2017, the Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, announced an action plan to improve the bilingual capacity of the superior court judiciary. The plan was well received. It addresses a number of recommendations made by the then Commissioner Graham Fraser and his counterparts in Ontario and New Brunswick in their 2013 joint study titled Access to Justice in Both Official Languages: Improving the Bilingual Capacity of the Superior Court Judiciary.

In December 2017, the House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages presented a study titled Ensuring Justice is Done in Both Official Languages, which was related to the 2013 study on the bilingual capacity of the superior court judiciary. However, this study also examined issues such as access to federal court decisions in both official languages and the funding allocated to the language rights component of the Court Challenges Program.

Key risks

Risks Mitigating strategy and effectiveness Link to the department’s programs Link to mandate letter commitments or to government-wide and departmental priorities
Changes to operational priorities, processes and objectives.
  • In fall 2017, the Office of the Commissioner started reflecting on Vision 2025. When the Commissioner arrived in late January 2018, a working group helped him better define the areas of focus for the coming years and the means with which the Office of the Commissioner can continue to have an impact on linguistic duality in federal institutions and Canadian society, to ensure the vitality of official language communities.
  • The initiatives identified during the activity-based costing exercise conducted in 2016–17 were implemented and continuous improvement exercises were carried out in order to better align resources and thereby relieve pressure.
  • Program 1: Protection
  • Program 2: Promotion
Not Applicable
Availability of appropriate performance indicators to support decision making.
  • The transition to the new Policy on Results is complete.
  • The Performance Measurement and Evaluation Committee was formed, and the Departmental Results Framework, Program Inventory and Performance Information Profiles were all developed and approved.
  • Program 1: Protection
  • Program 2: Promotion
Not Applicable

The key risks were identified based on a number of internal and external factors related to the Office of the Commissioner’s operating environment. These factors included the arrival of a new Commissioner, a steady volume of complaints requiring increasingly complex investigations, ongoing discussions on official languages policy, the changing face of official language minority communities, and public sector transformation.

The risk related to changes in operational priorities, processes and objectives due to budget constraints was considered a threat, and the risk related to the choice of appropriate performance indicators to support decision making was considered to be both an opportunity and a threat for the organization.

Results: What we achieved

Programs

Program 1.1: Protection of Language Rights

Description

Through this program, OCOL investigates complaints filed by citizens who believe their language rights have not been respected, evaluates compliance with the Official Languages Act by federal institutions and other organizations subject to the Act through performance measurements and audits, and intervenes proactively to prevent non-compliance with the Act. As well, the Commissioner may intervene before the courts in cases that deal with non-compliance with the Official Languages Act.

Results

The year 2017–18 was marked by the festivities for the country’s 150th anniversary. As part of the celebrations, admission to national parks was free. To that end, work was carried out in response to the Parks Canada audit follow-up. Parks Canada was able to implement the recommendations from the initial audit as a result of these interventions.

The Office of the Commissioner continued working with the Parliamentary Protective Service (PPS) in preparation for the 150th anniversary celebrations on Parliament Hill in 2017, and other events such as the G7 in 2018.

In 2017, the Office of the Commissioner released the results of the audit of the availability of learning services in English and French at the Canada School of Public Service.

A number of follow-ups on report recommendations were completed this year. These include the follow-up on the recommendations in the Early Childhood report, the report on language training, the annual reports up to 2016–17, the study on the bilingualism of the judiciary, and, particularly, the recommendation to establish a memorandum of understanding through a pilot project in Ontario to improve the bilingual capacity of the judiciary.

The development of an official languages maturity model was completed. The Office of the Commissioner will launch an internal pilot project in early 2018–19.

The Commissioner intervened in two Federal Court proceedings. Dionne v. Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions concerned language-of-work rights under Part V of the Official Languages Act, while FFCB v. Canada (Employment and Social Development) addressed rights in terms of the language of communications with and services to the public and the duty to take positive measures as part of the transfer payment agreement between the federal government and British Columbia. The Commissioner also requested and obtained intervenor status in Kassem Mazraani v. Industrial Alliance Insurance and Financial Services Inc., et al. The Supreme Court of Canada will hear the case in May 2018.

With regard to the review of the official languages Regulations, the Office of the Commissioner held meetings throughout the year with the Treasury Board Secretariat to share the Office of the Commissioner’s point of view and discuss the work carried out with a view to the modernization of the Regulations.

The Investigations Directorate continued to receive a high volume of complaints in 2017–18. There were slightly fewer admissible complaints in relation to last year (894 as opposed to 1,018). However, the volume was still high compared to the average of 730 complaints for the past five years.

The process used to verify the institutions’ implementation of the Commissioner’s recommendations in the final investigation reports was streamlined to facilitate decision making, strategically handle files and expedite the approval of follow-up reports.

The Office of the Commissioner has developed new strategies to have a greater impact on federal institutions and to manage new complaints against the institutions more effectively.
Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
The Canadian population receives responses to its complaints and inquiries according to established service standards. Percentage of responses provided within established service standards:
  • responses to inquiries within 30 working days
  • formal investigations within 175 working days
  • facilitated resolution within 90 working days
70% March 2018
  • Overall achievement of objectives: 45%Footnote 1
    • responses to inquiries within 30 working days: 87.5%
    • formal investigations within 175 working days: 39%
    • facilitated resolution within 90 working days: 51%
  • Overall achievement of objectives: 47%
    • responses to inquiries within 30 working days: 86%
    • formal investigations within 175 working days: 40%
    • facilitated resolution within 90 working days: 58%
45%
Federal institutions and other organizations subject to the Official Languages Act improve their capacity to meet the requirements of the Act. Percentage of the Commissioner's recommendations (made through audits and investigations) that have been implemented 60% March 2018
  • Overall achievement of objectives: 73%Footnote 2
    • Investigation recommendations partially or fully implemented: (73%) 126/172
    • Audit recommendations partially or fully implemented: (n/a) 0/0
  • Overall achievement of objectives: 92%
    • Investigation recommendations partially or fully implemented: (94%) 68/72
    • Audit recommendations partially or fully implemented: (67%) 8/12
100%
The Canadian population benefits from the Commissioner’s interventions before the courts. Percentage of legal proceedings involving the Commissioner that had a positive impact on the interpretation or application of the Act or the Charter 65% March 2018 75% 72% 57.5%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017–18
Difference
(Actual spending
minus Planned spending)
7,255,494 7,255,494 7,995,071 7,468,645 213,151
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus
Planned full-time equivalents)
64 65 1

Program 1.2: Promotion of Linguistic Duality

Description

Through this program, OCOL works with parliamentarians, federal institutions and other organizations subject to the Official Languages Act, official language communities and the Canadian public in promoting linguistic duality. OCOL builds links between federal institutions, official language communities and the different levels of government to help them better understand the needs of official language communities, the importance of bilingualism and the value of respecting Canada’s linguistic duality. To fulfill its role in that promotion, OCOL conducts research, studies and public awareness activities and intervenes with senior federal officials so that they instill a change in culture to fully integrate linguistic duality in their organizations.

Results

In 2017–18, the Office of the Commissioner focused on strategic initiatives to raise awareness among federal institutions and Canadians about the situation of official language minority communities, the importance of language rights and respecting linguistic duality. The Office of the Commissioner must ensure ongoing contact with various organizations, federal institutions and provincial and territorial partners in order to promote linguistic duality in all provinces and territories across Canada.

The Office of the Commissioner continued its promotional efforts by giving presentations in French-language and French-immersion schools across the country. The Office of the Commissioner’s staff also gave 95 presentations to groups of federal public servants, including workshops on bilingual meetings and on our Effective practices for chairing bilingual meetings guide and Take Action! tool.

The Office of the Commissioner’s staff directly informed the public about bilingualism and language rights at 67 kiosks, which were set up for various occasions. Other promotional activities were held across the country to advance linguistic duality in Canadian society and to promote the development of official language minority communities.

As part of the 150th anniversary of Confederation, the Office of the Commissioner held a conference on November 30, 2017. The theme of the conference was The Future of Linguistic Duality: Our Official Languages, Our Identity. The conference brought together 265 participants simultaneously in six cities (Ottawa, Moncton, Montréal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Edmonton).

We followed up on our exploratory study of the implications of digital technology for the Act. We started a conversation and shared the results and findings of the exploratory study with the federal institutions concerned.

Lastly, the Office of the Commissioner commissioned no fewer than six studies on the following subject areas, some for the purposes of internal reflection and analysis, others with a view to eventual publication:

  • The shortage of French-as-a-second-language teachers
  • International practices in open government and official languages
  • The socio-economic evolution of official language groups since 1969
  • Linguistic insecurity
  • Francophone spaces in minority settings
  • Federal official languages governance
Results achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
2015–16
Actual results
Parliament receives advice and information about the official languages implications of evolving legislation, regulations and policies. Number of appearances before parliamentary committees and interactions with parliamentarians 28Footnote 3 March 2018
  • Total of 15Footnote 4 including:
    • 2 appearances before the Senate
    • 3 appearances before the House of Commons; and
    • 10 interactions with parliamentarians
19 15
Canadian society is informed of official languages rights and obligations, and of the fundamental value of linguistic duality in Canada. Number of promotional activitiesFootnote 5 1,000 March 2018
  • 1,243 promotional activities, including:
    • 238 enquiries;
    • 20 speeches;
    • 29 media interviews;
    • 20 promotional tools;
    • 67 kiosks;
    • 6 press releases; and
    • 863 regional liaison meetings with official language communities and federal institutions.
1,341 1,439
Canadian society is informed of official languages rights and obligations, and of the fundamental value of linguistic duality in Canada. Percentage of the Commissioner's recommendations (made through annual reports, studies and other documents) that were implemented, in whole or in part, or were otherwise addressed within reasonable timelines. 60 March 2018
  • 100% of the recommendations in the 2015–16 annual report were partially or fully implemented.
  • 75% of the recommendations in the report on early childhood development in Francophone minority communities were implemented.
  • 100% of the recommendations in the 2014–2015 annual report were partially or fully implemented.
  • 75% of the recommendations in the study on language training entitled Challenges: The New Environment for Language Training in the Federal Public Service were implemented.
  • 80% of the recommendations in the study on language of work entitled Beyond Bilingual Meetings: Leadership Behaviours for Managers were implemented.
33%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017–18
Difference
(Actual spending minus
Planned spending)
6,840,895 6,840,895 7,555,305 7,403,591 562,696
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus
Planned full-time equivalents)
57 53 (4)

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Since legal remedies are set out in the Act, OCOL’s Legal Services are excluded from its Internal Services and are an integral part of Program 1.1 – Protection of Language Rights. As well, given their specific mandate, OCOL’s Communications Services are not included in Internal Services, but rather form part of Program 1.2 – Promotion of Linguistic Duality.

Results

In 2017–18, the Office of the Commissioner undertook a vision exercise that included a review of its management structure. After the arrival of the new commissioner in January 2018, the vision for the next seven years (Vision 2025) was established. The work will wrap up in 2018–19 with the completion of an action plan for the vision and a new structure.

In order to benefit from lessons learned, optimize the investment planning process at the Office of the Commissioner and ensure that funds are allocated to the Office of the Commissioner’s priorities, a steering committee was formed and an investment plan was approved. The new steering committee makes it possible for senior management to review investment proposals and make strategic decisions to advance the Office of the Commissioner’s mandate and optimize our activities. The committee also oversees investments and projects. Moreover, we have implemented an application development cycle with a view to more effectively managing the business solutions that support the Office of the Commissioner’s programs.

The Office of the Commissioner improved its business management system and expanded its use throughout the organization. To that end, it increased the number of user licences to cover all its employees. The work on the Advancement of Official Languages program will continue in 2018–19. In the coming years, we will analyze how the system can help us optimize our services to better serve Canadians, while ensuring that we have proper systems for our programs, taking into account both our needs and our limited resources. With this in mind, the Office of the Commissioner, like any other federal agency, must take into consideration the Government of Canada’s information technology modernization strategy.

Lastly, the Office of the Commissioner reviewed its human resources delegation instrument in order to improve it and support effective decision making. The review was also necessary following the changes resulting from the new staffing direction.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending
(authorities used)
2017–18
Difference
(Actual spending minus
Planned spending)
6,633,595 6,633,595 6,645,131 6,175,354 (458,241)
Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18
Planned full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual full-time equivalents
2017–18
Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus
Planned full-time equivalents)
42 41 (1)

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental Spending Trend Graph (In thousands of dollars)
  2015–16 2016–17 2017–18 2018–19 2019–20 2020–21
Statutory 2,116 2,105 2,119 2,181 2,181 2,181
Voted 18,114 18,330 18,928 19,101 19,101 19,101
Total 20,230 20,435 21,048 21,283 21,283 21,283
Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2017–18
Main Estimates
2017–18
Planned spending
2018–19
Planned spending
2019–20
Planned spending
2017–18
Total authorities available for use
2017–18
Actual spending (authorities used)
2016–17
Actual spending (authorities used)
2015–16
Actual spending (authorities used)
Protection of Language Rights 7,255,494 7,255,494 7,448,906 7,448,906 7,995,071 7,468,645 7,554,792 6,673,506
Promotion of Linguistic Duality 6,840,895 6,840,895 7,023,254 7,023,254 7,555,305 7,403,591 6,638,658 6,059,233
Subtotal 14,096,389 14,096,389 14,472,160 14,472,160 15,550,376 14,872,236 14,193,450 12,732,739
Internal Services 6,633,595 6,633,595 6,810,428 6,810,428 6,645,131 6,175,354 6,241,270 7,497,292
Total 20,729,984 20,729,984 21,282,588 21,282,588 22,195,507 21,047,590 20,434,720 20,230,031

In 2016-17, severance pays were higher due to a higher number of people retiring. In 2017-18, these expenditures were back to normal. However, this decrease was offset by retroactive payments that were paid as several collective agreements were signed.

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Programs and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Programs and Internal Services 2015–16
Actual
full-time equivalents
2016–17
Actual
full-time equivalents
2017–18
Planned
full-time equivalents
2017–18
Actual
full-time equivalents
2018–19
Planned
full-time equivalents
2019–20
Planned
full-time equivalents
Protection of Language Rights 64 63 64 65 65 65
Promotion of Linguistic Duality 53 54 57 53 57 57
Subtotal 117 117 121 118 122 122
Internal Services 44 41 42 41 41 41
Total 161 158 163 159 163 163

There were no significant fluctuations in the level of full-time equivalents (FTE) from 2015–16 to 2017–18 for the organisation as a whole. In 2017-18, the actual number FTE was 2.5% or 4 FTEs below the forecast due to vacant positions. The FTE total represents a growth of 0.6% that is largely due to the staffing of vacant positions in the Protection of Language Rights.

The human resources level for 2018–19 and 2019–20 reflects the approved resources which have remained constant. FTEs are expected to remain relatively stable over the planning horizon.

Expenditures by vote

For information on the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ organizational voted and statutory expenditures, please consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017-2018.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ financial statements for the year ended March 31, 2018.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations for the year ended March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Condensed Statement of Operations for the year ended March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2017–18
Planned results
2017–18
Actual results
2016–17
Actual results
Difference
(2017–18 Actual results minus
2017–18 Planned results)
Difference
(2017–18 Actual results minus
2016–17 Actual results)
Total expenses 23,860,776 24,116,648 23,491,289 255,872 625,359
Total revenues - - - - -
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 23,860,776 24,116,648 23,491,289 255,872 625,359
Condensed Statement of Financial Position as at March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Condensed Statement of Financial Position as of March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial Information 2017–18 2016–17 Difference
(2017–18 minus 2016–17)
Total net liabilities 3,674,437 3,200,663 473,774
Total net financial assets 2,467,791 1,865,355 602,436
Departmental net debt 1,206,646 1,335,308 (128,662)
Total non-financial assets 2,050,790 2,127,915 (77,125)
Departmental net financial position 844,144 792,607 51,537
 
Assets by type
Assets by type
Assets Consolidated Revenue Fund Accounts receivable and advances Prepaid expenses Tangible capital assets
Amount ($) 2,061,605 406,186 245,173 1,805,617

Total assets were $4,518,581 at the end of 2017-18, an increase of $525,311 (13 percent) over the previous year’s total assets of $3,993,270. Of the total assets, the Consolidated Revenue Fund totaled $2,061,605 (46 percent) and the tangible capital assets represented $1,805,617 (40 percent). Accounts receivable and advances as well as prepaid expenses accounted for 9 percent and 5 percent of total assets, respectively.

Liabilities by type
Liabilities by type
Liabilities Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Accrued salaries Vacation pay and compensatory leave Employee future benefits
Amount ($) 1,233,167 1,212,739 915,264 313,267

Total liabilities were $3,674,437 at the end of 2017-18, a decrease of $473,774 (15 percent) over the previous year’s total liabilities of $3,200,663. Accounts payable and accrued liabilities as well as accrued salaries represented the largest portion of the total liabilities, at $2,445,906 (77 percent). Vacation pay and compensatory leave as well as employee future benefits accounted for 25 percent and 8 percent of total liabilities, respectively.

Expenses - Where funds go
Expenses - Where funds go
Expenses Protection of linguistic rights Promotion of linguistic duality Internal services
Amount ($) 8,781,273 8,509,556 6,825,819

 

Total expenses for the Office of the Commissioner were $24,116,648 in 2017-18. The largest share of the funds was spent on the Office of the Commissioner’s programs ($17,290,829), while internal services represented $6,825,819, or 28 percent, of total expenses.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Commissioner:
Raymond Théberge
Enabling instrument:
Subsection 56(1) of the Official Languages Act
Year of incorporation/ commencement:
1970
Other:
The Commissioner of Official Languages is appointed by commission under the Great Seal, after approval by resolution of the House of Commons and the Senate. The Commissioner reports directly to Parliament.

Reporting framework

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture of record for 2017–18 are shown below:

  1. Strategic Outcome: Rights guaranteed by the Official Languages Act are protected and linguistic duality is promoted as a fundamental value of Canadian society.
    • 1.1 Program: Protection of Language Rights
    • 1.2 Program: Promotion of Linguistic Duality
    • Internal Services

Supplementary information tables

Fees

Owing to legislative changes, the fees results for the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages are available in the 2017 to 2018 Fees Report.

Departmental Sustainable Development Strategy

Target 7.2: Green Procurement

As of April 1, 2014, the Government of Canada will continue to take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement.

Scope and Context

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages (OCOL) procures over $5 million in goods and services per year, in multiple commodity categories. Although greening of our procurement can be integrated throughout our activities, OCOL is focusing on three prospective areas for greening its procurement: using standing offers for purchase of goods; replacing desktop computers with laptops to reduce energy consumption; and using recycled photocopy paper.

Performance Measurement
Expected result

Environmentally responsible acquisition, use and disposal of goods and services.

Performance indicator Targeted performance level
Departmental approach to further the implementation of the Policy on Green Procurement in place. OCOL has integrated green procurement criteria in its procurement request forms.
Number and percentage of specialists in procurement and/or materiel management who have completed the Canada School of Public Service Green Procurement course or equivalent, in 2017-18. 2
100%
Number and percentage of managers and functional heads of procurement and materiel whose performance evaluation includes support and contribution towards green procurement, in 2017-18. 1
100%
Departmental green procurement target

Regular use of standing offers for purchasing office equipment that is environment friendly.

Performance indicator Targeted performance level
All requests for office equipment to be processed by the Procurement Section. 100%
Departmental green procurement target

Reduce energy consumption by replacing desktop computers with laptops

Performance indicator Targeted performance level
Desktop computers have been replaced by laptops for all employees. 100%
Departmental green procurement target

Use of photocopy paper with a 30% recycled content.

Performance indicator Targeted performance level
All photocopy paper purchased has 30% recycled content. 95%
Achieved
Implementation strategy element or best practice Targeted performance level
7.2.1.5. Leverage common use procurement instruments where available and feasible. Achieved
 

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

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Appendix: Definitions

appropriation
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Plan
Provides information on the plans and expected performance of appropriated departments over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Results Report
Provides information on the actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
evaluation
In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.
experimentation
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full-time equivalent
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)
An analytical approach used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people may experience policies, programs and initiatives. The “plus” in GBA+ acknowledges that the gender-based analysis goes beyond biological (sex) and socio-cultural (gender) differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability. Examples of GBA+ processes include using data disaggregated by sex, gender and other intersecting identity factors in performance analysis, and identifying any impacts of the program on diverse groups of people, with a view to adjusting these initiatives to make them more inclusive.
government-wide priorities
For the purpose of the 2017–18 Departmental Results Report, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government; A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiatives
An initiative where two or more federal organizations, through an approved funding agreement, work toward achieving clearly defined shared outcomes, and which has been designated (for example, by Cabinet or a central agency) as a horizontal initiative for managing and reporting purposes.
Management, Resources and Results Structure
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
Non-budgetary expenditures
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
prioritiy
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.
program
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
result
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program
A time-limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
Date modified:
2019-03-18