Since 1867

Official Languages in Canada

Displaying 1 - 37 of 37 result(s)
Students and teachers at the Morrin College around 1891
1868

Morrin College is the first English-language institute of higher education in Québec City

The college is built in the heart of the heart of Old Québec, on the former site of an old defensive structure called the Royal Redoubt, which served as a military barracks and then a prison before being demolished to make way for the current building.
1869

The Quebec legislature adopts Chapter 16 of the Statutes of the Province of Quebec, an education provision for the English-speaking minority

The new bill grants additional privileges in education for the Anglo-Protestant minority.
1891

The Supreme Court of Canada renders its first decision about the equal authority of the English and French versions of legislation

Faced with a question on the interpretation of sections of the Civil Code of Quebec, the Supreme Court of Canada stated that both the English and French versions of the text are of equal authority.
October 22, 1926

The first meeting of the secret society of the Commandeurs de l’Ordre de Jacques-Cartier is held in Ontario

The society is a reflection of a certain amount of frustration among French Canadians who feel that their rights are being ignored.
September 10, 1960

The Rassemblement pour l’indépendance nationale is founded in Quebec

It begins as a gathering of about 30 people involved in defending Quebec’s rights; a few weeks later, the Rassemblement pour l’indépendance nationale publishes its manifesto.
1969

Quebec passes its first piece of legislation to promote the French language in the province

The Quebec government passes the Act to promote the French Language in Québec.
Pierre Elliott Trudeau and Robert Bourassa attending the funeral of Pierre Laporte. 
1970

A series of social and political events take place in Quebec, culminating in the October Crisis

The October Crisis occurs during a difficult time for Francophones in Quebec, who felt victimized by the power Anglophones held in society.
1972

Report concludes that French should be the only official language of the province of Quebec

The Commission of Inquiry on the Position of the French Language and on Language Rights in Quebec (also known as the Gendron Commission) issues its findings.
Hôtel du Parlement du Québec, 1977
1974

Quebec passes its Official Language Act

The Official Language Act replaces the Act to promote the French language in Quebec and makes French the province’s official language.
A crowd attending the Superfrancofête
1974

The Festival international de la jeunesse francophone (known as Superfrancofête) kicks off in Québec City

Opening night at the Superfrancofête attracts over 100,000 people from around the world!
CASA logo
1975

The English-speaking community on Quebec’s Gaspé Coast founds the Committee for Anglophone Social Action

During this politically charged time in Quebec, English-speaking communities join forces to deal with the changes that are occurring.
Association des gens de l'air du Québec Logo
1976

The Gens de l’air crisis erupts in Quebec

In the early 1970s, the expansion of the air transport industry and the arrival of a growing number of Francophones among its ranks lead to the idea that air communications could take place in French.
René Lévesque on provincial election night 
November 15, 1976

The Parti Québécois wins the provincial election with a strong majority

The Parti Québécois advocates independence for Quebec and protection of the French language.
Charter of the French Language cover's picture
August 26, 1977

Quebec’s National Assembly adopts the Charter of the French Language

The provisions of the Charter of the French Language, commonly known as Bill 101, affect the activities of the government, commerce, business, education and the courts.
1979

In the Blaikie case, the provisions of the Charter of the French Language that make French the only language of legislation are challenged

The Supreme Court of Canada decides that these provisions violate section 133 of the Constitution Act, 1867.
Picture of an event during Townshiper' Day, Hatley (Quebec) in 1981
1979

Townshippers’ Day is created in Quebec’s Eastern Townships

This first T-Day is organized by the Townshippers’ Association, a not-for-profit organization.
1982

Alliance Quebec is created

Alliance Quebec is formed to advocate for the province’s English-speaking community.
Canadian Parents for French logo
1983

The Quebec branch of the Canadian Parents for French is founded

It is the eighth provincial/territorial branch of the Canadian Parents for French network.
1984

The Supreme Court of Canada renders its first decision regarding minority language education under section 23 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms

The Supreme Court of Canada ruled that parents who received instruction in English in Canada have the right to send their children to English-language schools in Quebec.
1986

Quebec passes a bill to provide its English-speaking citizens with health care and social services in their language

Section 15 of the Act respecting health services and social services recognizes the right of English-speaking Quebecers to receive health care and social services in their language.
1986

The first Summit of La Francophonie is held in Paris

Canada is represented by the federal government and the provinces of Quebec and New Brunswick.
François Mitterrand, Brian Mulroney and Robert Bourassa, at a press conference during the summit in Québec City.
1987

The 1987 Summit of La Francophonie in Québec City

Québec City plays host to the second-ever international Summit of La Francophonie.
1988

The Supreme Court of Canada renders its decision in the Ford case

Quebec invokes the notwithstanding clause of the Constitution to retain the exclusive use of French on outdoor signage.
Quebec Community Groups Network Logo
1995

The Quebec Community Groups Network is founded

In 1994, Canadian Heritage brought together 15 Quebec-based regional and sectoral organizations to better manage program and funding priorities. A year later, that group founded the Quebec Community Groups Network.
1997

Quebec seeks to create non-denominational school boards

The province establishes linguistic school boards instead.
Blue Metropolis Foundation Logo
1997

The Blue Metropolis Foundation is established in Montréal, Quebec

The Foundation’s mission is to bring people of different cultures together to share in the pleasure of reading and writing.
Sign of the Supreme Court of Canada
1998

The Supreme Court of Canada renders its decision in the Reference re Secession of Quebec case

The decision provides new legal tools for protecting the rights of linguistic minorities.
Sign of the Supreme Court of Canada
2005

The Supreme Court of Canada favours continuity in language of education

The Supreme Court of Canada handed down its decision on whether the requirement that children receive the “major part” of their education in English in order to obtain a certificate of eligibility to attend English public school, pursuant to section 73(2) of Quebec’s Charter of the French Language, is consistent with minority language education rights protected under section 23(2) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
Hôtel du Parlement du Québec, 1977
2006

The Quebec Policy on the Canadian Francophonie is adopted

The policy seeks to give Quebec a coordinating role and commits the province to taking concrete actions to support Canada’s Francophone and Acadian communities.
2008

Quebec City celebrates its 400th anniversary

The celebration also commemorates 400 years of a permanent French presence in North America.
2009

The Supreme Court of Canada renders a decision on the constitutionality of the limits imposed by Quebec’s Charter of the French Language regarding access to minority language education in Quebec

The Supreme Court of Canada ruled that it is unconstitutional to exclude the time spent in an unsubsidized English-language private school from the determination of what constitutes a “major part” of a child’s education for the purposes of establishing eligibility for public minority language education.
Alignment flags of the Francophonie
2012

The first French Language World Forum is held in Québec City

Its objective is to give Francophones from all five continents the opportunity to discuss French-language issues in a non-institutional setting.
2013

A new group called Seniors Action Quebec is founded

It motto is “A seniors network… for seniors… by seniors.”
2013

The Quebec Court of Appeal rules on multiple language rights violations during criminal proceedings

The Quebec Court of Appeal found that there had been numerous language rights violations during joint criminal proceedings and ordered new trials.
Canadian Parents for French logo
2014

Canadian Parents for French returns to Quebec

Canadian Parents for French launches a community outreach project in Quebec.
Nous sommes tous Acadiens-We are all Acadians
2014

For the first time, the World Acadian Congress is held in two countries

Canada and the United States play host to the 5th quinquennial World Acadian Congress.
2014

Federal government announces the Marine Rescue Sub-Centre in Québec City will remain open

In 2011, Fisheries and Oceans Canada announced the closure of the Marine Rescue Sub-Centre in Québec City, triggering strong reactions from people worried about losing the public’s right to be served in French.