1935

The Supreme Court of Canada extends the scope of the equal authenticity rule for legislative texts to federal legislation

The Supreme Court of Canada ruled that the English and French versions of federal laws and statutes are equally authoritative.

The Supreme Court of Canada stated that both the English and French versions of the statutes pass through the two Houses of Parliament and receive Royal Assent at the same time and according to the same procedures. The two versions are therefore equally authoritative statutes of the Parliament of Canada, which is why they must be read together when interpreting a provision of a federal statute in order to determine the legislature’s intention.

The principle of both versions being equally authentic was set out in the Official Languages Act of 1969.