Quiz on Canada’s Official Languages

How well do you know the history of Canada’s official languages? Students from Grade 8 to Grade 12 will have fun testing their general knowledge online with this quiz. Good luck!

 

Correct!

The Official Languages Act

The purpose of the Official Languages Act is to:

  • ensure that the equal status of English and French is respected within the Government of Canada and that all Canadians have the same rights and privileges, no matter which of the two languages is used;
  • support the development of English and French communities across Canada; and
  • advance the equal status and use of English and French in Canadian society.
 

Incorrect

 

Correct!

A language used in the administration of a country or region

An official language is a language used in the administration of a country or region. In Canada, the official languages are English and French. The choice of a country’s official language(s) is generally the result of policy decisions and is enshrined in its laws or constitution.

 

Incorrect

 

Correct!

New Brunswick

Of Canada’s 10 provinces, only New Brunswick is officially bilingual. Quebec is the only province where French is the sole official language, although some services and rights are recognized for English speakers. In the eight other provinces, English is the main language used in administration, but French speakers have some services and rights recognized in provincial laws and policies, as well as provisions of the constitution. In Yukon, one of Canada’s three territories, English and French are the official languages, while the Northwest Territories and Nunavut are officially multilingual and accord official language status to English, French and Indigenous languages. Canada itself is officially bilingual at the federal level.

 

Incorrect

 

Correct!

Laurentian University in Sudbury, Ontario

Laurentian University in Sudbury is a bilingual university (as is the University of Ottawa). Quebec has two English language universities: Bishop’s University in Sherbrooke and McGill University in Montréal. Université Sainte Anne and Université de Saint Boniface are French language post secondary institutions located outside of Quebec. Many other educational institutions outside of Quebec offer courses in French, such as Campus Saint-Jean in Edmonton and the Université de Moncton.

 

Incorrect

 

Correct!

Active offer

When you go to an office or facility of a federal institution that is designated bilingual, you have the right to be served in the official language of your choice. A bilingual greeting is a clear way to tell you that service is available in both official languages. How can you find out whether an office or facility is designated bilingual? By using Burolis, a search engine that shows which federal offices and facilities provide service in English, French or both.

 

Incorrect

 

Correct!

8 million

According to the 2016 census, exactly 7,914,489 people in Canada (22.8% of the population) speak French. Both official languages are spoken in all ten provinces and three territories of Canada.

 

Incorrect

 

Correct!

All of the above!

Young Canadians have often advocated for human rights, acceptance and openness. Groups of young people were also the most ardent champions of the Official Languages Act when it was enacted in 1969. Some examples of initiatives that young people worked hard to make a reality:

It just goes to show, you can make a difference!

 

Incorrect

 

Correct!

All of the above!

Learning another language improves your memory and ability to concentrate—which comes in handy for exams! You can also make new friends even if you don’t have the same mother tongue. Plus, if you become fluent in English and French, you can travel anywhere in Canada! There are many other benefits to learning both of Canada’s official languages. Can you think of some?

 

Incorrect

 

Correct!

Recognition for the equal status of English and French

Linguistic duality is the recognition of two official language, each of which is equal to the other in status and both of which belong to all Canadians. The idea behind linguistic duality is for Canadians to feel comfortable speaking in either English or French.

 

Incorrect

 

Correct!

All of the above!

Linguistic duality is beneficial to Canadians in several ways. Respect and openness are deeply ingrained Canadian values, in large part thanks to our linguistic duality, which has taught us to coexist and respect one another. Linguistic duality is an important part of Canadian culture and encourages openness toward others. It makes it possible for Canada to have relationships with trade representatives from a variety of countries where English and/or French are spoken, be it officially or unofficially. If you’re interested, we encourage you to learn (and practice!) both of Canada’s official languages.

 

Incorrect

 
Date modified:
2020-09-29