Recommendations Follow-up: 2006–2007 to 2013–2014

 
Recommendations Status of Follow-up by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages Implementation Status
2006–2007

Recommendation 1

The Commissioner recommends that the Minister for Official Languages, in cooperation with the communities, provinces and territories, create an initiative, over the coming year, that will succeed the Action Plan for Official Languages and consolidate what has been gained. During the design process, the federal government must carefully consider expanding the scope of the Action Plan to include, in particular, arts and culture, youth initiatives and new measures for promoting linguistic duality.

Follow-up complete

Recommendation implemented

The Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2003-2008: Acting for the Future replaced the Action Plan for Official Languages. The Roadmap contains the points mentioned in the recommendation.

Recommendation 2

The Commissioner recommends that the Minister for Official Languages review the Official Languages Accountability and Coordination Framework, not only in light of the changes made to official language governance, but also to better reflect the obligations and responsibilities of federal institutions following the legislative amendments of November 2005.

Follow-up complete

During his appearance before the House of Commons Standing Committee on Official Languages on March 15, 2012, the Commissioner of Official Languages reiterated the importance of including an accountability framework in upcoming discussions on the Roadmap.

Recommendation not implemented

A horizontal management and results-based accountability framework has been published by Canadian Heritage. However, it is not a framework that establishes clear accountability relationships and it only targets key federal institutions that are associated with the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2003-2008: Acting for the Future.

Recommendation 3

The Commissioner recommends that the Minister for Official Languages ensure Canadian Heritage review its accountability mechanisms for the implementation of sections 41 and 42 of the Official Languages Act in order to place more emphasis on results.

Follow-up complete

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages had a number of discussions with Canadian Heritage about its three-level approach to see how and to what extent official language minority communities had been taken into consideration.

Results of the audit were published in fall 2013.

Recommendation implemented

Canadian Heritage implemented a new three-level approach to categorizing federal institutions based on their potential impact on official language minority communities. The approach based on designated federal institutions was abandoned.

Since 2010–2011, all federal institutions have had to report to Canadian Heritage on their Part VII results. They must do so every three years, at the same time that the Treasury Board Secretariat requires reports on the other parts of the Official Languages Act. Canadian Heritage will follow up annually at the request of official language minority communities.

Recommendation 4

The Commissioner recommends that the Minister for Official Languages ensure Canadian Heritage take a more transparent approach in the implementation of section 41 of the Act when determining the institutions that have the most significant impact on communities and on the promotion of linguistic duality.

Follow-up complete

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages had a number of discussions with Canadian Heritage about its three-level approach to see how and to what extent official language minority communities had been taken into consideration.

Recommendation implemented

Since Canadian Heritage recognizes that all the federal institutions have obligations in terms of implementing Part VII, it took into account the amendments made to the Official Languages Act in 2005 and the interpretation of the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages. By determining federal institutions’ potential, Canadian Heritage can take a targeted approach to follow-up and oversight.

Recommendation 5

The Commissioner recommends that deputy heads in federal institutions ensure that front-line employees and all agents who respond to client enquiries actively offer services in both official languages at first contact in order to enhance the use of the public's official language of choice.

Monitoring ongoing

Follow-up is being done through the Commissioner of Official Languages' annual reports, the institutions' report cards and the audits conducted by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

A similar recommendation is expressed in volume II of the 2009-2010 annual report.

Recommendation to be implemented in the long term

Implementation status is detailed in the Commissioner of Official Languages' annual reports, the institutions' report cards and the audits conducted by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages. The in-person active offer continues to be a compliance issue for federal institutions.

A project to examine the active offer issue more closely has recently begun. A first exploratory meeting was held in February 2014 to identify the objectives and format of the project.

2007–2008

Recommendation 1

The Commissioner recommends that the Prime Minister:

  1. create an ad hoc committee of ministers, chaired by the Minister for Official Languages, to oversee the full implementation of the new action plan and language requirements within all federal institutions;
  1. Follow-up complete

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages notes that not only has the government not set up a special committee of ministers on official languages, it has created a Committee of Assistant Deputy Ministers on Official Languages, which replaced the Committee of Deputy Ministers on Official Languages.

  1. Recommendation not implemented
  1. ensure Cabinet, supported by the Official Languages Secretariat, reviews official languages matters at least once a year;
  1. Follow-up complete
  1. Recommendation not implemented
  1. ensure the Official Languages Secretariat is given the authority it needs to fulfill a horizontal coordination role in order to implement the Official Languages Act in its entirety.
  1. Follow-up complete

The Official Languages Secretariat, which is in charge of horizontal coordination of the Official Languages Act, fell under a central agency. It was transferred to Canadian Heritage in 2006. Since 2013, it has been fully integrated into Canadian Heritage’s Official Languages Support Programs Branch. It is impossible to say whether it has the necessary authority to play a horizontal coordination role with respect to implementing the Act, since its functions interlock with those of a department having a specific mandate.

  1. Recommendation not implemented

Recommendation 2

The Commissioner recommends that the Clerk of the Privy Council ensure deputy ministers’ annual performance reviews include efforts to implement the Official Languages Act in its entirety, especially Part VII.

Follow-up complete

The Clerk of the Privy Council asks the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages to participate in the annual evaluation of deputy ministers. Their performance on official languages is therefore evaluated to a certain extent.

Recommendation partially implemented

The Clerk of the Privy Council is using the Management Accountability Framework (MAF) to evaluate deputy ministers, even though the Management Accountability Framework does not have much to say about official languages and contains no evaluation criteria for Part VII of the Official Languages Act.

The MAF evaluation criteria change each year, such that official languages are not always evaluated the same way based on the same criteria for all federal institutions.

Recommendation 3

The Commissioner recommends that the Minister for Official Languages give the Official Languages Secretariat the mandate of reviewing the official languages accountability and reporting requirements to simplify the process and, above all, strengthen the focus on results.

Follow-up complete

Recommendation partially implemented

Canadian Heritage and the Treasury Board Secretariat have implemented a combined accountability exercise for some federal institutions that allows the institutions to report only once. A Treasury Board Secretariat representative told the Departmental Advisory Committee on Official Languages in October 2011 that this initiative stemmed directly from the recommendation of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

Recommendation 4

The Commissioner recommends that the Clerk of the Privy Council ensure linguistic duality is fully integrated into public service renewal initiatives, especially in recruitment, training and development, so that linguistic duality is considered a value in the federal administration.

Follow-up complete

Recommendation partially implemented

The 18th report of the Clerk of the Privy Council calls on deputy heads to report on public service renewal by February 1, 2012, including a component on official languages.

The 19th report of the Clerk of the Privy Council in 2012 states, “And deputy heads have also reported on their organizations’ progress against the renewal objectives set out in my Eighteenth Annual Report. I am pleased to note that departments and agencies are actively creating the conditions for our institution’s future success. Processes are being streamlined, resource-sharing is reducing costs, and employee engagement efforts have increased.” Examples of initiatives are available on the Clerk of the Privy Council’s website. However, official languages are not mentioned in connection with this initiative.

Nonetheless, the 19th report of the Clerk of the Privy Council goes on to say, “We must not let up our efforts to nurture workplaces that support the use of both official languages, even as we tackle reductions. . . . This will result in productive and fulfilling work environments, improve our ability to attract and retain great employees, and enable us to better serve Canadians in both official languages.”

The 20th report of the Clerk of the Privy Council in 2013 recognizes linguistic duality as, “central to the values of the Public Service.” The Clerk states that “By serving Canadians in both English and French, by creating a work environment that encourages employees in bilingual regions to work in the official language of their choice, and by promoting linguistic duality in Canadian society, our federal institutions give concrete expression to Canada’s commitment to bilingualism.” In the report, the launch of ourlanguages.gc.ca on the go! in September 2012 is given as an example of official languages promotion.

Recommendation 5

The Commissioner recommends that the Prime Minister ensure the government fully respects its linguistic obligations and the vitality of official language communities during any large-scale reform, such as program reviews, transfers of responsibilities, or decisions to change the nature of, privatize or move a federal institution.

Monitoring ongoing

This recommendation is all the more relevant in view of the current fiscal constraints, and the Commissioner continues to reiterate this message.

In its ongoing monitoring, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages wants to ensure that, among other things, any fundamental reform of the immigration system takes official languages into account.

Recommendation to be implemented in the long term

Monitoring of DRAP complaints
Eight DRAP-related investigations are under way or have been completed. A horizontal analysis of these complaints has been conducted and incorporated into the 2013–2014 annual report.

Ongoing monitoring of various files related to the recommendation

Recommendation 6

The Commissioner recommends that the Secretary of the Treasury Board of Canada demonstrate, by December 31, 2008, that the Secretariat (the lead federal institution for expenditure review) has taken the necessary steps to ensure expenditure and similar reviews within the federal government are designed and conducted in full compliance with the commitments, duties and roles prescribed in Part VII of the Official Languages Act.

Follow-up underway

The Commissioner of Official Languages personally contacted the Treasury Board Secretariat to share his concerns about the impact the expenditure review might have on official languages.

The 2010–2011 report card for the Treasury Board Secretariat was also used to deliver this message to the institution.

In 2013–2014, an audit will be conducted on this issue.

Recommendation not implemented

The Treasury Board Secretariat responded to the Commissioner of Official Languages regarding its intention to take official languages into account in its cost-cutting exercise. However, there is no evidence of concrete implementation.

The audit to determine how the TBS, a central agency, fulfilled its obligations as set out in Part VIII of the Act in the context of the Strategic and Operating Review (SOR) and the Deficit Reduction Action Plan (DRAP) was reactivated in February 2014. The objectives and criteria were discussed with the institution in March 2014. We will now be able to determine the next steps in the audit.

Recommendation 7

The Commissioner recommends that deputy heads of all federal institutions take concrete steps, by December 31, 2008, to create a work environment that is more conducive to the use of both English and French by employees in designated regions.

Follow-up complete

The 2009–2010 annual report mentions follow-up on this recommendation, in particular the responses obtained from the 117 federal institutions.

Follow-up is being done through the Commissioner of Official Languages' annual reports, the institutions' report cards and the audits conducted by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

Recommendation partially implemented

Implementation status is detailed in the Commissioner of Official Languages' annual reports, the institutions' report cards and the audits conducted by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

2008–2009

Recommendation 1

In order to stay the course on linguistic duality, the Commissioner recommends that the Prime Minister of Canada ensure the government, through its budget decisions and its economic stimulus investments, turns its commitment to linguistic duality and the development of official language minority communities into action.

Monitoring ongoing

In 2010, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages produced report cards for institutions that were paying out large sums of money to Canadians.

In 2011, the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages audited Industry Canada with respect to Part VII of the Official Languages Act.

Recommendation to be implemented in the long term

The government’s strategic and operational review is not fundamentally at odds with the recommendation. However, for federal institutions, staying the course on linguistic duality is easier said than done in an environment of fiscal constraints and cutbacks.

Recommendation 2

The Commissioner recommends that the President of the Treasury Board:

  1. fully assume his responsibilities under Part VIII of the Official Languages Act towards all federal institutions, including separate employers;
  1. Follow-up complete
  1. Recommendation not implemented
  1. report to Parliament on the implementation of the Treasury Board’s official languages programs.
  1. Follow-up complete

The Treasury Board Secretariat had fallen behind in submitting its annual reports to Parliament, but it now seems to have caught up. However, the institution's annual reports are increasingly brief.

  1. Recommendation implemented

Recommendation 3

With regard to the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games, the Commissioner recommends:

  • that the Minister of Canadian Heritage and the President of the Treasury Board exercise greater and coordinated leadership among federal institutions so that the responsibilities for linguistic obligations are clarified, all necessary human and financial resources are made available, and clear accountability mechanisms for bilingual service delivery are established;
  • that deputy heads of each federal institution involved in the Games clearly identify measures that their institutions are taking to ensure full compliance with all official languages obligations, and that they provide the Commissioner and parliamentary committees with regular progress updates.

Follow-up complete

The Final Report on the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games contains an update on the issue.

  • Recommendation implemented

The federal institutions reported to the Commissioner on actions taken. Implementation status is detailed in the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ Final Report on the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

  • Recommendation implemented

The federal institutions reported to the Commissioner on actions taken. Implementation status is detailed in the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages’ Final Report on the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

Recommendation 4

The Commissioner recommends that the Minister of Transport table, as quickly as possible, a new bill to protect and uphold the language rights of the travelling public and Air Canada employees, regardless of the nature of the changes to the structure and organization of the air transport industry.

Follow-up complete

This recommendation has been made three times by two different Commissioners, but no bill has been passed yet. The Commissioner repeats the recommendation at his meetings with Transport Canada.

Recommendation not implemented

Although the government has tabled bills on the matter, none has proceeded beyond second reading:

  • Bill C-29 – October 2006
  • Bill C-36 – October 2007
  • Bill C-17 – December 2011

Recommendation 5

The Commissioner recommends that the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages:

  • implement, as soon as possible, the commitments announced in the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future to support second official language learning;
  1. Follow-up complete
  1. Recommendation implemented

The first part of the recommendation focused on launching all the components of the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future. Programs were started and funding was provided for all components.

  • develop, by March 31, 2010, appropriate coordination mechanisms, bringing together all partners involved in English or French second-language learning in Canada;
  1. Follow-up complete
  1. Recommendation implemented

In May 2010, Canadian Heritage organized three days of dialogue concerning respectively the Francophone and Acadian communities, the Quebec Anglophone communities and linguistic duality. It was during the day on linguistic duality that speakers stressed issues related to the learning of a second language.

  • report, by the end of fiscal year 2010–2011, on these measures and the results that they helped achieve.
  1. Follow-up complete
  1. Recommendation partially implemented

In 2012, following consultations with stakeholders, Canadian Heritage released a mid-term report on the implementation of the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future.

Recommendation 6

The Commissioner recommends that the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages continue to fully implement, as quickly as possible, the commitments to official language minority communities in the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future.

Follow-up complete

Recommendation implemented

In 2012, following consultations with stakeholders, Canadian Heritage released a mid-term report on the implementation of the Roadmap for Canada’s Linguistic Duality 2008-2013: Acting for the Future.

The Commissioner was interviewed as part of the evaluation of the 2008–2013 plan to give his assessment of the implementation.

2009–2010: Vol. I

Recommendation 1

The Commissioner recommends that, with regard to the implementation of the Protocol for Agreements for Minority-Language Education and Second-Language Instruction for 2009-2010 to 2012-2013, the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages actively encourage all provinces and territories to consult all concerned associations and groups so that the bilateral accords can be more effectively designed and applied, and their impact appropriately assessed.

Monitoring ongoing

Recommendation to be implemented in the long term

The government will soon sign a new memorandum of understanding on education. Bilateral negotiations will then take place in fall 2013 or winter 2014.

Recommendation 2

The Commissioner recommends that the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages report, by March 31, 2011, on the actions that he has taken to speed up the signing and implementation of collaboration agreements and other agreements between the federal government and official language minority communities. The Minister is asked to indicate in his report how he has ensured that community organizations receive one quarter of their funding by April 1 of each fiscal year.

Follow-up complete

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages conducted an investigation.

Recommendation implemented

Canadian Heritage changed and improved the process so that community organizations receive one quarter of their funding by April 1 of each fiscal year.

Since the recommendation was addressed, the institution has shared its action plan and reported on measures taken to rectify the situation.

After the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages followed up with official language minority communities regarding the changes made by Canadian Heritage, the communities have noticed an improvement.

Recommendation 3

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that the Prime Minister take all required measures to ensure that new initiatives in alternative modes of service delivery (privatization; partnership or decentralization agreements) do not adversely affect the language rights of Canadians–in particular, members of official language minority communities.

Monitoring ongoing

Recommendation to be implemented in the long term

Recommendation 4

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that the Clerk of the Privy Council make the use of English and French as languages of work in federal institutions a significant priority within the framework of any initiative related to Public Service renewal and improved services for Canadians.

There is ongoing monitoring of the Public Service Employee Survey, which includes language-of-work data.

Follow-up is being done through the Commissioner of Official Languages' annual reports, the institutions' report cards and the audits conducted by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

  1. Follow-up complete

Official languages are not an essential priority, but rather one aspect of public service renewal.

  1. Recommendation partially implemented

More specifically, the Commissioner recommends that senior officials manage the human resources of their department or agency by applying the most promising practices advanced in Monique Collette's report.

Follow-up is being done through the Commissioner of Official Languages' annual reports, the institutions' report cards and the audits conducted by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

  1. Follow-up complete

Implementation status is detailed in the Commissioner of Official Languages' annual reports, the institutions' report cards and the audits conducted by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

  1. Recommendation partially implemented

The Commissioner also recommends that senior officials report to the Clerk of the Privy Council on the measures they have taken to provide their staff with more opportunities to work in the official language of their choice.

The Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages communicated with the Clerk of the Privy Council to find out what measures the federal institutions have taken.

  1. Follow-up underway

The responses from the deputy ministers, requested by the Clerk of the Privy Council (recommendation in his 18th report), were included in his annual report.

  1. Recommendation partially implemented
2009–2010: Vol. II

Recommendation 1

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that the Minister of Transport table a new bill as quickly as possible to protect and uphold the language rights of the travelling public and Air Canada employees, and make Jazz directly subject to the Official Languages Act.

Follow-up complete

This recommendation has been made three times by two different Commissioners, but no bill has been passed yet. The Commissioner repeats the recommendation at his meetings with Transport Canada.

Recommendation not implemented

Although the government has tabled bills on the matter, none has proceeded beyond second reading:

  • Bill C-29 – October 2006
  • Bill C-36 – October 2007
  • Bill C-17 – December 2011

Recommendation 2

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that the deputy heads of federal institutions take all of the necessary measures to ensure that people who contact offices with bilingual service delivery obligations are informed, unequivocally, that they have the right to use English or French. Institutions should evaluate, in particular, whether new active-offer strategies allow them to better inform Canadians of their language-of-service rights.

Follow-up underway

Follow-up is being done through the Commissioner of Official Languages' annual reports, the institutions' report cards and the audits conducted by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

In 2013–2014, the Office of the Commissioner will conduct an observation exercise targeting service to the public in nine institutions that were evaluated in 2008–2009.

Recommendation partially implemented

Implementation status is detailed in the Commissioner of Official Languages' annual reports, the institutions' report cards and the audits conducted by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages. The in-person active offer continues to be a compliance issue for federal institutions.

A project to examine the active offer issue more closely has recently begun. A first exploratory meeting was held in February 2014 to identify the objectives and format of the project.

Recommendation 3

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that deputy heads of federal institutions take specific and long-term measures to ensure that their employees are able to use the official language of their choice in written communications.

Monitoring ongoing

There is ongoing monitoring of the Public Service Employee Survey, which includes language-of-work data.
Follow-up is being done through the Commissioner of Official Languages' annual reports, the institutions' report cards and the audits conducted by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

The Commissioner of Official Languages will continue to deliver similar messages in his annual reports.

Recommendation to be implemented in the long term

Implementation status is detailed in the Commissioner of Official Languages' annual reports, the institutions' report cards, the 2014 PSES and the audits conducted by the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages.

2010–2011

Recommendation 1

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that the Prime Minister of Canada amend Part VIII of the Official Languages Act in order to assign the following responsibilities to the Treasury Board: establish policies to give effect to Part VII; recommend regulations to the Governor in Council to give effect to Part VII; issue directives to give effect to Part VII; and provide information to the public and to federal institutions relating to the policies and programs that give effect to Part VII.

Follow-up complete

Recommendation not implemented

Recommendation 2

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that the Prime Minister of Canada and the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages clearly communicate their commitment to Part VII of the Official Languages Act, and confirm that it is important and a priority for all federal institutions to take positive measures to promote English and French and support the development of official language communities;

  1. Follow-up complete

There was no specific political nod to Part VII in the Speech from the Throne or elsewhere to indicate its importance in the official languages universe.

  1. Recommendation not implemented

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that the Clerk of the Privy Council take measures to make senior management of federal institutions more accountable for the way in which their organizations implement Part VII of the Official Languages Act, and ensure that they report the results obtained in this area to the Canadian public;

  1. Follow-up to come

The Privy Council Office’s Review of Official Languages for 2012–2013 indicates that there is no specific program or initiative for Part VII. There have been some minimal achievements, such as Linguistic Duality Day and the fact that Memoranda to Cabinet must take the Official Languages Act into account. The Clerk nonetheless stressed the importance of official languages as a public service value (in his 20th report). There was no explicit reference to obligations under Part VII, the communities or linguistic duality in Canadian society.

The government, through the Minister of Official Languages, did renew the Roadmap in March 2013. However, that horizontal measure does not in itself support the other federal institutions by providing them with advice or tools for action or accountability.

However, Canadian Heritage reiterated that the accountability framework for Part VII, which was initially included in the 2003–2008 Action Plan for Official Languages, applied to all federal institutions and was still valid.

  1. Recommendation partially implemented

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that senior management of federal institutions implement the Official Languages Act in its entirety, by including Part VII in their institutions’ decision-making processes.

  1. Follow-up to come
  1. Implementation status has yet to be confirmed.

Recommendation 3

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that, by November 30, 2012, the President of the Treasury Board establish CBC/CBC as the minimum level of language skills required to supervise employees in regions designated as bilingual for language-of-work purposes.

Follow-up complete

Recommendation not implemented

The Treasury Board Secretariat of Canada is not implementing this recommendation for two reasons:

  1. This kind of requirement is too heavy a burden for federal institutions in terms of human and financial resources because of the language training needs that would be created.
  2. It would be inconsistent to treat all managers the same way when section 91 of the Official Languages Act says that linguistic profiles should be established objectively based on the requirements of the position.

However, even though the Treasury Board Secretariat did not implement this recommendation, the official languages policy was revised so employees in bilingual regions can be supervised in the official language of their choice if their supervisor has a language level of CBC. This is a step in the right direction to make managers aware of their obligations.

Recommendation 4

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that by March 31, 2013, the Minister of Transport, Infrastructure and Communities make the necessary legislative changes to clarify the language obligations of airport authorities and thus confirm the right of the general public to communicate with them and receive services in either official language, pursuant to Part IV of the Official Languages Act.

Follow-up complete

Recommendation not implemented

2011–2012

Recommendation 1

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that, in the run-up to Canada's 150th birthday, the Prime Minister take the necessary measures to double the number of young Canadians who participate each year in short- and long-term language exchanges at the high-school and post-secondary levels.

Follow-up complete

Recommendation not implemented

The Roadmap for Canada’s Official Languages 2013-2018 does not include new funding to address this recommendation. In fact, there has been a $15 million decrease in support for second-language instruction and a $5.55 million drop in funding for language exchanges (summer language bursaries, official languages monitors, and youth initiatives).

Recommendation 2

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages work together with provincial and territorial governments as well as post-secondary institutions to increase the number of programs in which students can take courses in their second official language.

Follow-up underway

Recommendation partially implemented

The last update of the interactive map showed a continuing increase in the number of programs in which students can take courses in their second official language in universities across Canada.

Recommendation 3

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that the Minister of Industry create a support mechanism to encourage Canadian businesses to develop their capacity to operate and provide services in both official languages.

Follow-up underway

Implementation status has yet to be confirmed

2012–2013

Recommendation 1

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that the deputy heads of federal institutions establish a directive on language training within their institution by October 31, 2014, if they have not already done so.

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that the President of the Treasury Board verify that federal institutions have established a directive on language training, and that he report back to Parliament during the fiscal year 2014–2015.

Recommendation too recent for immediate follow-up—follow-up to come

Follow-up on recommendations usually begins within two years after the annual report has been tabled.

Implementation status has yet to be confirmed

Recommendation 2

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that, as part of their respective responsibilities, the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages and the President of the Treasury Board:

  • develop a new horizontal management and accountability framework for the Roadmap for Canada’s Official Languages 2013-2018: Education, Immigration, Communities by October 31, 2014,
  • ensure rigorous accountability and coordination of the 2013–2018 Roadmap, and
  • continue to have an open dialogue with groups targeted by the investments in the 2013–2018 Roadmap and inform Canadians of the results.

Following discussions with Canadian Heritage, we were informed that a new framework for the 2013–2018 Roadmap was being developed, but that it would not be made public.

  • Follow-up complete
  • Follow-up to come
  • Follow-up to come
  • Implementation status has yet to be confirmed
  • Implementation status has yet to be confirmed
  • Implementation status has yet to be confirmed

Recommendation 3

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that, by October 31, 2014, the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, in cooperation with official language minority communities, provinces, territories and federal institutions, implement a follow-up initiative to the Strategic Plan to Foster Immigration to Francophone Minority Communities, and specify the roles and responsibilities of the various partners, ways of achieving the planned results, and the evaluation and data collection mechanisms.

Follow-up under way

Following discussions with the Department, we were informed that Citizenship and Immigration Canada does not intend to renew the Strategic Plan. Rather, it plans to concentrate on the objectives in the new Roadmap. The Steering Committee membership has changed and now consists of the various branches in the Department. The Department has created a new official languages secretariat.

In a letter to the Commissioner in March 2014, Minister Alexander indicated that the immigration initiative for the OLMCs in the Roadmap for Canada’s Official Languages 2013–2018 is a follow-up program to the simplified Strategic Plan and that it includes a performance measurement strategy. The strategy sets out, among other things, roles and responsibilities, ways to reach anticipated outcomes, monitoring mechanisms and an assessment framework. The Minister also stated that the new governance model, which includes a simplified version of the CIC-FMC Steering Committee, sets out the partners’ roles and responsibilities, and that the Department will ensure that Francophone immigration is addressed by the Department’s federal-provincial-territorial roundtables on immigration.

Recommendation partially implemented

Recommendation 4

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that, by October 31, 2014, the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages establish clear objectives to raise the level of bilingualism among Canadians and reverse the decline in bilingualism among Anglophones by 2017.

Recommendation too recent for immediate follow-up—follow-up to come

Follow-up on recommendations usually begins within two years after the annual report has been tabled.

Implementation status has yet to be confirmed

Recommendation 5

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that, by September 1, 2014, the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada implement a collaborative approach with his provincial and territorial counterparts to ensure that the bilingual capacity of Canada’s superior court judiciary is consistent and appropriate at all times.

Recommendation too recent for immediate follow-up—follow-up to come

Follow-up on recommendations usually begins within two years after the annual report has been tabled.

Implementation status has yet to be confirmed

Recommendation 6

The Commissioner of Official Languages recommends that, starting in 2013–2014, the President of the Treasury Board and the Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages add questions to their assessments in order to determine the impact of budget cuts as a result of the 2011 Deficit Reduction Action Plan. These questions should reveal:

  • the changes to resources and governance structures of federal institutions’ official languages programs, at both the regional and national level; and
  • the impact of budget cuts on federal institutions’ ability to fulfill their official languages obligations under each part of the Act.

Recommendation too recent for immediate follow-up—follow-up to come

Follow-up on recommendations usually begins within two years after the annual report has been tabled.

Implementation status has yet to be confirmed

Summary

Status of implementation of recommendations or parts of recommendations Number Percentage
Recommendation implemented 10 19.6%
Recommendation partially implemented 12 23.5%
Recommendation not implemented 13 25.5%
Recommendation to be implemented in the long term 6 11.8%
No response from the government to date 0 0%
Implementation status has yet to be confirmed 10 19.6%
Total 51 100%
Date modified:
2020-09-18